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Title: Spatial Patterns and Intensity of the Surface Storm Tracks in CMIP5 Models

Abstract

To improve the understanding of storm tracks and western boundary current (WBC) interactions, surface storm tracks in 12 CMIP5 models are examined against ERA-Interim. All models capture an equatorward displacement toward the WBCs in the locations of the surface storm tracks’ maxima relative to those at 850 hPa. An estimated storm-track metric is developed to analyze the location of the surface storm track. It shows that the equatorward shift is influenced by both the lower-tropospheric instability and the baroclinicity. Basin-scale spatial correlations between models and ERA-Interim for the storm tracks, near-surface stability, SST gradient, and baroclinicity are calculated to test the ability of the GCMs’ match reanalysis. An intermodel comparison of the spatial correlations suggests that differences (relative to ERA-Interim) in the position of the storm track aloft have the strongest influence on differences in the surface storm-track position. However, in the North Atlantic, biases in the surface storm track north of the Gulf Stream are related to biases in the SST. An analysis of the strength of the storm tracks shows that most models generate a weaker storm track at the surface than 850 hPa, consistent with observations, although some outliers are found. A linear relationship exists among themore » models between storm-track amplitudes at 500 and 850 hPa, but not between 850 hPa and the surface. In total, the work reveals a dual role in forcing the surface storm track from aloft and from the ocean surface in CMIP5 models, with the atmosphere having the larger relative influence.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States)
  2. Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., Woods Hole, MA (United States)
  3. Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)
  4. National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)
  5. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Toulouse (France)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1537009
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0006743; SC0014433
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Climate
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 13; Journal ID: ISSN 0894-8755
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences

Citation Formats

Booth, James F., Kwon, Young-Oh, Ko, Stanley, Small, R. Justin, and Msadek, Rym. Spatial Patterns and Intensity of the Surface Storm Tracks in CMIP5 Models. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1175/jcli-d-16-0228.1.
Booth, James F., Kwon, Young-Oh, Ko, Stanley, Small, R. Justin, & Msadek, Rym. Spatial Patterns and Intensity of the Surface Storm Tracks in CMIP5 Models. United States. doi:10.1175/jcli-d-16-0228.1.
Booth, James F., Kwon, Young-Oh, Ko, Stanley, Small, R. Justin, and Msadek, Rym. Thu . "Spatial Patterns and Intensity of the Surface Storm Tracks in CMIP5 Models". United States. doi:10.1175/jcli-d-16-0228.1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1537009.
@article{osti_1537009,
title = {Spatial Patterns and Intensity of the Surface Storm Tracks in CMIP5 Models},
author = {Booth, James F. and Kwon, Young-Oh and Ko, Stanley and Small, R. Justin and Msadek, Rym},
abstractNote = {To improve the understanding of storm tracks and western boundary current (WBC) interactions, surface storm tracks in 12 CMIP5 models are examined against ERA-Interim. All models capture an equatorward displacement toward the WBCs in the locations of the surface storm tracks’ maxima relative to those at 850 hPa. An estimated storm-track metric is developed to analyze the location of the surface storm track. It shows that the equatorward shift is influenced by both the lower-tropospheric instability and the baroclinicity. Basin-scale spatial correlations between models and ERA-Interim for the storm tracks, near-surface stability, SST gradient, and baroclinicity are calculated to test the ability of the GCMs’ match reanalysis. An intermodel comparison of the spatial correlations suggests that differences (relative to ERA-Interim) in the position of the storm track aloft have the strongest influence on differences in the surface storm-track position. However, in the North Atlantic, biases in the surface storm track north of the Gulf Stream are related to biases in the SST. An analysis of the strength of the storm tracks shows that most models generate a weaker storm track at the surface than 850 hPa, consistent with observations, although some outliers are found. A linear relationship exists among the models between storm-track amplitudes at 500 and 850 hPa, but not between 850 hPa and the surface. In total, the work reveals a dual role in forcing the surface storm track from aloft and from the ocean surface in CMIP5 models, with the atmosphere having the larger relative influence.},
doi = {10.1175/jcli-d-16-0228.1},
journal = {Journal of Climate},
number = 13,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {6}
}

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