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Title: Shock-Driven Decomposition of Polymers and Polymeric Foams

Abstract

Polymers and foams are pervasive in everyday life, as well as in specialized contexts such as space exploration, industry, and defense. They are frequently subject to shock loading in the latter cases, and will chemically decompose to small molecule gases and carbon (soot) under loads of sufficient strength. We review a body of work—most of it performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory—on polymers and foams under extreme conditions. To provide some context, we begin with a brief review of basic concepts in shockwave physics, including features particular to transitions (chemical reaction or phase transition) entailing an abrupt reduction in volume. We then discuss chemical formulations and synthesis, as well as experimental platforms used to interrogate polymers under shock loading. A high-level summary of equations of state for polymers and their decomposition products is provided, and their application illustrated. We then present results including temperatures and product compositions, thresholds for reaction, wave profiles, and some peculiarities of traditional modeling approaches. We close with some thoughts regarding future work.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1511261
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-19-20377
Journal ID: ISSN 2073-4360; POLYCK
Grant/Contract Number:  
89233218CNA000001
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Polymers
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 2073-4360
Publisher:
MDPI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; polymers; foams; shock physics; shock chemistry; equation of state; shock compression

Citation Formats

Dattelbaum, Dana Mcgraw, and Coe, Joshua Damon. Shock-Driven Decomposition of Polymers and Polymeric Foams. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.3390/polym11030493.
Dattelbaum, Dana Mcgraw, & Coe, Joshua Damon. Shock-Driven Decomposition of Polymers and Polymeric Foams. United States. doi:10.3390/polym11030493.
Dattelbaum, Dana Mcgraw, and Coe, Joshua Damon. Wed . "Shock-Driven Decomposition of Polymers and Polymeric Foams". United States. doi:10.3390/polym11030493. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1511261.
@article{osti_1511261,
title = {Shock-Driven Decomposition of Polymers and Polymeric Foams},
author = {Dattelbaum, Dana Mcgraw and Coe, Joshua Damon},
abstractNote = {Polymers and foams are pervasive in everyday life, as well as in specialized contexts such as space exploration, industry, and defense. They are frequently subject to shock loading in the latter cases, and will chemically decompose to small molecule gases and carbon (soot) under loads of sufficient strength. We review a body of work—most of it performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory—on polymers and foams under extreme conditions. To provide some context, we begin with a brief review of basic concepts in shockwave physics, including features particular to transitions (chemical reaction or phase transition) entailing an abrupt reduction in volume. We then discuss chemical formulations and synthesis, as well as experimental platforms used to interrogate polymers under shock loading. A high-level summary of equations of state for polymers and their decomposition products is provided, and their application illustrated. We then present results including temperatures and product compositions, thresholds for reaction, wave profiles, and some peculiarities of traditional modeling approaches. We close with some thoughts regarding future work.},
doi = {10.3390/polym11030493},
journal = {Polymers},
number = 3,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
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