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Title: Introduction to the Special Issue on Ocean Warming

Abstract

With atmospheric CO2 levels rising unabated, the climate system is warming at the fastest rate in human history. It has long been known that the vast bulk of extra heat associated with anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions is entering the ocean (e.g., Hansen et al., 1988; Levitus et al., 2000; Barnett et al., 2005), causing warming at the surface and through much of the ocean’s depth. This warming drives thermal expansion of the ocean that, together with added mass from rapidly melting glaciers and ice sheets, is accelerating the rise in sea levels (Church et al., 2013). As the mean state of the ocean changes, so do its extremes. Marine heatwaves are becoming more frequent and more intense (e.g., Oliver et al., 2018; Hobday et al.), and increasing sea levels are resulting in more damage from storms in coastal regions (e.g., Hauer, 2017). In addition, marine species are being significantly affected, with populations moving poleward to escape the heat (e.g., Sorte et al., 2010), loss of key habitat-forming species (e.g., Wernberg, 2013, 2016), and mass bleaching and mortality of coral reefs (e.g., Hughes, 2017). Simultaneously, more intense hurricanes, destructive wildfires, and severe droughts have been occurring across the global terrestrial landscape.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)
  3. Univ. of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER). Earth and Environmental Systems Science Division
OSTI Identifier:
1491990
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-763611
Journal ID: ISSN 1042-8275; 953463
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Oceanography
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1042-8275
Publisher:
The Oceanography Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Durack, Paul, Sen Gupta, Alex, and Smedsrud, Lars. Introduction to the Special Issue on Ocean Warming. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. https://doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2018.226.
Durack, Paul, Sen Gupta, Alex, & Smedsrud, Lars. Introduction to the Special Issue on Ocean Warming. United States. https://doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2018.226
Durack, Paul, Sen Gupta, Alex, and Smedsrud, Lars. Fri . "Introduction to the Special Issue on Ocean Warming". United States. https://doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2018.226. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1491990.
@article{osti_1491990,
title = {Introduction to the Special Issue on Ocean Warming},
author = {Durack, Paul and Sen Gupta, Alex and Smedsrud, Lars},
abstractNote = {With atmospheric CO2 levels rising unabated, the climate system is warming at the fastest rate in human history. It has long been known that the vast bulk of extra heat associated with anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions is entering the ocean (e.g., Hansen et al., 1988; Levitus et al., 2000; Barnett et al., 2005), causing warming at the surface and through much of the ocean’s depth. This warming drives thermal expansion of the ocean that, together with added mass from rapidly melting glaciers and ice sheets, is accelerating the rise in sea levels (Church et al., 2013). As the mean state of the ocean changes, so do its extremes. Marine heatwaves are becoming more frequent and more intense (e.g., Oliver et al., 2018; Hobday et al.), and increasing sea levels are resulting in more damage from storms in coastal regions (e.g., Hauer, 2017). In addition, marine species are being significantly affected, with populations moving poleward to escape the heat (e.g., Sorte et al., 2010), loss of key habitat-forming species (e.g., Wernberg, 2013, 2016), and mass bleaching and mortality of coral reefs (e.g., Hughes, 2017). Simultaneously, more intense hurricanes, destructive wildfires, and severe droughts have been occurring across the global terrestrial landscape.},
doi = {10.5670/oceanog.2018.226},
journal = {Oceanography},
number = 2,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {6}
}

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