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Title: Viewpoint Set on Nuclear Materials Science

Abstract

Materials science has historically played critical roles in developing today’s nuclear energy systems. The current mainstream nuclear materials such as the zirconium alloys for fuels and core components and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels were essential enabling materials for present day nuclear power and they undergo continued science-based fine tuning. Discovery of void swelling and other radiation effect phenomena in a fast neutron spectrum is largely responsible for the development of modern nuclear steels with enhanced radiation tolerance and, to a certain extent, the struggle of fast spectrum reactor development. Understandings the effects of neutron irradiation and the operating thermochemical environment in heat-resistant alloys, core graphite, and SiC-coated particle fuels have enabled the high temperature helium cooled reactors as a passively safe nuclear energy technology that is now anticipating mass deployment.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division
  2. Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Ningbo (China). Engineering Lab. of Specialty Fibers and Nuclear Energy Materials. Ningbo Inst. of Industrial Technology
  3. Wuhan Univ. of Technology (China). International School of Materials Science and Engineering
  4. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1474708
Grant/Contract Number:  
[AC05-00OR22725]
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scripta Materialia
Additional Journal Information:
[ Journal Volume: 143]; Journal ID: ISSN 1359-6462
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

Citation Formats

Katoh, Yutai, Huang, Qing, Han, Young-Hwan, and Risbud, Subhash. Viewpoint Set on Nuclear Materials Science. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.scriptamat.2017.08.028.
Katoh, Yutai, Huang, Qing, Han, Young-Hwan, & Risbud, Subhash. Viewpoint Set on Nuclear Materials Science. United States. doi:10.1016/j.scriptamat.2017.08.028.
Katoh, Yutai, Huang, Qing, Han, Young-Hwan, and Risbud, Subhash. Wed . "Viewpoint Set on Nuclear Materials Science". United States. doi:10.1016/j.scriptamat.2017.08.028. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1474708.
@article{osti_1474708,
title = {Viewpoint Set on Nuclear Materials Science},
author = {Katoh, Yutai and Huang, Qing and Han, Young-Hwan and Risbud, Subhash},
abstractNote = {Materials science has historically played critical roles in developing today’s nuclear energy systems. The current mainstream nuclear materials such as the zirconium alloys for fuels and core components and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels were essential enabling materials for present day nuclear power and they undergo continued science-based fine tuning. Discovery of void swelling and other radiation effect phenomena in a fast neutron spectrum is largely responsible for the development of modern nuclear steels with enhanced radiation tolerance and, to a certain extent, the struggle of fast spectrum reactor development. Understandings the effects of neutron irradiation and the operating thermochemical environment in heat-resistant alloys, core graphite, and SiC-coated particle fuels have enabled the high temperature helium cooled reactors as a passively safe nuclear energy technology that is now anticipating mass deployment.},
doi = {10.1016/j.scriptamat.2017.08.028},
journal = {Scripta Materialia},
number = ,
volume = [143],
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
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