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Title: Editorial: Biomass Modification, Characterization, and Process Monitoring Analytics to Support Biofuel and Biomaterial Production

Abstract

This Frontiers Research Topic journeys through various challenges facing researchers seeking to develop fuels and products derived from lignocellulosic biomass. These challenges include: the rapid quantification of plant cell wall chemistry, enabling yields of potential monomeric sugars to be assessed, identification of plants possessing ideal trait that can be brought to the forefront of research efforts; once the native plant chemistry is known, how can yields be improved by chemically or genetically altering plant cell walls to reduce recalcitrance; does genetic modification of plants to increase accessibility to saccharification enzymes hinder the plant’s growth and/or function; are the innovative methods identified by researchers cost-effective and scalable to a commercial level? These topics are a sampling of the obstacles researchers combat when nominating a specific plant for downstream applications or implementing new deconstruction, genetic, or measurement strategies. How well can different plants can be broken down into useful, downstream precursor molecules? Efforts to develop a lucid picture of the chemical composition of abundant, diverse plants being explored as potential starting feedstocks has resulted in the evolution of high-throughput techniques that permit many more samples to be screened in much shorter periods of time. Advances in thermochemical and spectroscopic techniques have enabledmore » the screening of thousands of plants for different phenotypes, such as cell-wall composition and monomeric sugar release. Some instrumental methods have been coupled with multivariate analysis, providing elegant chemometric predictive models enabling the accelerated identification of potential feedstocks. Rapid instrumental techniques have been developed for real-time monitoring of diverse processes, such as the efficacy of specific pretreatment strategies, or downstream products, such as biofuels and biomaterials. Real-time process monitoring techniques are needed for all stages of the feedstocks-to-biofuels conversion process to maximize efficiency and lower costs by monitoring and optimizing performance. These approaches allow researchers to adjust experimental conditions during, rather than at the conclusion, of processes, thereby decreasing overhead expenses.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia). Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI)
  2. Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia). Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Biological Systems Science Division
OSTI Identifier:
1459367
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: MAR; Journal ID: ISSN 2296-4185
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; high-throughput screening assays; genetic manipulation; glycoside hydrolases; Raman spectroscopy; NIMS; cell-wall degrading enzymes; biomass pretreatment and fractionation

Citation Formats

Lupoi, Jason, Simmons, Blake, and Henry, Robert. Editorial: Biomass Modification, Characterization, and Process Monitoring Analytics to Support Biofuel and Biomaterial Production. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.3389/fbioe.2016.00025.
Lupoi, Jason, Simmons, Blake, & Henry, Robert. Editorial: Biomass Modification, Characterization, and Process Monitoring Analytics to Support Biofuel and Biomaterial Production. United States. doi:10.3389/fbioe.2016.00025.
Lupoi, Jason, Simmons, Blake, and Henry, Robert. Thu . "Editorial: Biomass Modification, Characterization, and Process Monitoring Analytics to Support Biofuel and Biomaterial Production". United States. doi:10.3389/fbioe.2016.00025. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1459367.
@article{osti_1459367,
title = {Editorial: Biomass Modification, Characterization, and Process Monitoring Analytics to Support Biofuel and Biomaterial Production},
author = {Lupoi, Jason and Simmons, Blake and Henry, Robert},
abstractNote = {This Frontiers Research Topic journeys through various challenges facing researchers seeking to develop fuels and products derived from lignocellulosic biomass. These challenges include: the rapid quantification of plant cell wall chemistry, enabling yields of potential monomeric sugars to be assessed, identification of plants possessing ideal trait that can be brought to the forefront of research efforts; once the native plant chemistry is known, how can yields be improved by chemically or genetically altering plant cell walls to reduce recalcitrance; does genetic modification of plants to increase accessibility to saccharification enzymes hinder the plant’s growth and/or function; are the innovative methods identified by researchers cost-effective and scalable to a commercial level? These topics are a sampling of the obstacles researchers combat when nominating a specific plant for downstream applications or implementing new deconstruction, genetic, or measurement strategies. How well can different plants can be broken down into useful, downstream precursor molecules? Efforts to develop a lucid picture of the chemical composition of abundant, diverse plants being explored as potential starting feedstocks has resulted in the evolution of high-throughput techniques that permit many more samples to be screened in much shorter periods of time. Advances in thermochemical and spectroscopic techniques have enabled the screening of thousands of plants for different phenotypes, such as cell-wall composition and monomeric sugar release. Some instrumental methods have been coupled with multivariate analysis, providing elegant chemometric predictive models enabling the accelerated identification of potential feedstocks. Rapid instrumental techniques have been developed for real-time monitoring of diverse processes, such as the efficacy of specific pretreatment strategies, or downstream products, such as biofuels and biomaterials. Real-time process monitoring techniques are needed for all stages of the feedstocks-to-biofuels conversion process to maximize efficiency and lower costs by monitoring and optimizing performance. These approaches allow researchers to adjust experimental conditions during, rather than at the conclusion, of processes, thereby decreasing overhead expenses.},
doi = {10.3389/fbioe.2016.00025},
journal = {Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology},
number = MAR,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {3}
}

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