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Title: Precision Electron Beam Polarimetry for Next Generation Nuclear Physics Experiments

Polarized electron beams have played an important role in scattering experiments at moderate to high beam energies. Historically, these experiments have been primarily targeted at studying hadronic structure - from the quark contribution to the spin structure of protons and neutrons, to nucleon elastic form factors, as well as contributions to these elastic form factors from (strange) sea quarks. Other experiments have aimed to place constraints on new physics beyond the Standard Model. For most experiments, knowledge of the magnitude of the electron beam polarization has not been a limiting systematic uncertainty, with only moderately precise beam polarimetry requirements. However, a new generation of experiments will require extremely precise measurements of the beam polarization, significantly better than 1%. This article will review standard electron beam polarimetry techniques and possible future technologies, with an emphasis on the ever-improving precision that is being driven by the requirements of electron scattering experiments.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [3]
  1. Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany)
  2. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
JLAB-PHY-18-2612; DOE/OR/23177-4300
Journal ID: ISSN 0218-3013
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-06OR23177
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Modern Physics E
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 0218-3013
Publisher:
World Scientific
Research Org:
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Nuclear Physics (NP) (SC-26)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS
OSTI Identifier:
1458439

Aulenbacher, Kurt, Chudakov, Eugene, Gaskell, David, Grames, Joseph, and Paschke, Kent D. Precision Electron Beam Polarimetry for Next Generation Nuclear Physics Experiments. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1142/S0218301318300047.
Aulenbacher, Kurt, Chudakov, Eugene, Gaskell, David, Grames, Joseph, & Paschke, Kent D. Precision Electron Beam Polarimetry for Next Generation Nuclear Physics Experiments. United States. doi:10.1142/S0218301318300047.
Aulenbacher, Kurt, Chudakov, Eugene, Gaskell, David, Grames, Joseph, and Paschke, Kent D. 2018. "Precision Electron Beam Polarimetry for Next Generation Nuclear Physics Experiments". United States. doi:10.1142/S0218301318300047. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1458439.
@article{osti_1458439,
title = {Precision Electron Beam Polarimetry for Next Generation Nuclear Physics Experiments},
author = {Aulenbacher, Kurt and Chudakov, Eugene and Gaskell, David and Grames, Joseph and Paschke, Kent D.},
abstractNote = {Polarized electron beams have played an important role in scattering experiments at moderate to high beam energies. Historically, these experiments have been primarily targeted at studying hadronic structure - from the quark contribution to the spin structure of protons and neutrons, to nucleon elastic form factors, as well as contributions to these elastic form factors from (strange) sea quarks. Other experiments have aimed to place constraints on new physics beyond the Standard Model. For most experiments, knowledge of the magnitude of the electron beam polarization has not been a limiting systematic uncertainty, with only moderately precise beam polarimetry requirements. However, a new generation of experiments will require extremely precise measurements of the beam polarization, significantly better than 1%. This article will review standard electron beam polarimetry techniques and possible future technologies, with an emphasis on the ever-improving precision that is being driven by the requirements of electron scattering experiments.},
doi = {10.1142/S0218301318300047},
journal = {International Journal of Modern Physics E},
number = 7,
volume = 27,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {6}
}