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Title: Legacy effects of land use on soil nitrous oxide emissions in annual crop and perennial grassland ecosystems

Abstract

Land use conversions into and out of agriculture may influence soil–atmosphere greenhouse gas fluxes for many years. We tested the legacy effects of land use on cumulative soil nitrous oxide (N 2O) fluxes for 5 yr following conversion of 22-yr-old Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) grasslands and conventionally tilled agricultural fields (AGR) to continuous no-till corn, switchgrass, and restored prairie. An unconverted CRP field served as a reference. We assessed the labile soil C pool of the upper 10 cm in 2009 (the conversion year) and in 2014 using short-term soil incubations. We also measured in situ soil N 2O fluxes biweekly from 2009 through 2014 using static chambers except when soils were frozen. The labile C pool was approximately twofold higher in soils previously in CRP than in those formerly in tilled cropland. Five-year cumulative soil N 2O emissions were approximately threefold higher in the corn system on former CRP than on former cropland despite similar fertilization rates (~184 kg N·ha -1·yr -1). The lower cumulative emissions from corn on former cropland were similar to emissions from switchgrass that was fertilized less (~57 kg N·ha -1·yr -1), regardless of former land use, and lowest emissions were observed from the unfertilizedmore » restored prairie and reference systems. Lastly, findings support the hypothesis that soil labile carbon levels modulate the response of soil N 2O emissions to nitrogen inputs, with soils higher in labile carbon but otherwise similar, in this case reflecting land use history, responding more strongly to added nitrogen.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Center for Global Change and Earth Observations; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). W.K. Kellogg Biological Station
  2. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). W.K. Kellogg Biological Station
  3. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). W.K. Kellogg Biological Station; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Integrative Biology
  4. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Center for Global Change and Earth Observations; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Sciences
  5. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). W.K. Kellogg Biological Station; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Plant, Soil, and Microbial Sciences
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1439918
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1439919; OSTI ID: 1459409
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0018409; FC02-07ER64494
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Ecological Applications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 1051-0761
Publisher:
Ecological Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Climate change; Conservation Reserve Program; corn; emission factor; grassland; greenhouse gas; labile soil carbon; land use change; no till; restored prairie; smooth brome grass; switchgrass

Citation Formats

Abraha, Michael, Gelfand, Ilya, Hamilton, Stephen K., Chen, Jiquan, and Robertson, G. Philip. Legacy effects of land use on soil nitrous oxide emissions in annual crop and perennial grassland ecosystems. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/eap.1745.
Abraha, Michael, Gelfand, Ilya, Hamilton, Stephen K., Chen, Jiquan, & Robertson, G. Philip. Legacy effects of land use on soil nitrous oxide emissions in annual crop and perennial grassland ecosystems. United States. doi:10.1002/eap.1745.
Abraha, Michael, Gelfand, Ilya, Hamilton, Stephen K., Chen, Jiquan, and Robertson, G. Philip. Fri . "Legacy effects of land use on soil nitrous oxide emissions in annual crop and perennial grassland ecosystems". United States. doi:10.1002/eap.1745.
@article{osti_1439918,
title = {Legacy effects of land use on soil nitrous oxide emissions in annual crop and perennial grassland ecosystems},
author = {Abraha, Michael and Gelfand, Ilya and Hamilton, Stephen K. and Chen, Jiquan and Robertson, G. Philip},
abstractNote = {Land use conversions into and out of agriculture may influence soil–atmosphere greenhouse gas fluxes for many years. We tested the legacy effects of land use on cumulative soil nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes for 5 yr following conversion of 22-yr-old Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) grasslands and conventionally tilled agricultural fields (AGR) to continuous no-till corn, switchgrass, and restored prairie. An unconverted CRP field served as a reference. We assessed the labile soil C pool of the upper 10 cm in 2009 (the conversion year) and in 2014 using short-term soil incubations. We also measured in situ soil N2O fluxes biweekly from 2009 through 2014 using static chambers except when soils were frozen. The labile C pool was approximately twofold higher in soils previously in CRP than in those formerly in tilled cropland. Five-year cumulative soil N2O emissions were approximately threefold higher in the corn system on former CRP than on former cropland despite similar fertilization rates (~184 kg N·ha-1·yr-1). The lower cumulative emissions from corn on former cropland were similar to emissions from switchgrass that was fertilized less (~57 kg N·ha-1·yr-1), regardless of former land use, and lowest emissions were observed from the unfertilized restored prairie and reference systems. Lastly, findings support the hypothesis that soil labile carbon levels modulate the response of soil N2O emissions to nitrogen inputs, with soils higher in labile carbon but otherwise similar, in this case reflecting land use history, responding more strongly to added nitrogen.},
doi = {10.1002/eap.1745},
journal = {Ecological Applications},
number = 5,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {6}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1002/eap.1745

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Cited by: 1 work
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Works referenced in this record:

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration Rates by Tillage and Crop Rotation
journal, January 2002

  • West, Tristram O.; Post, Wilfred M.
  • Soil Science Society of America Journal, Vol. 66, Issue 6, p. 1930-1946
  • DOI: 10.2136/sssaj2002.1930

Data from: Legacy effects of land use on soil nitrous oxide emissions in annual crop and perennial grassland ecosystems
dataset, April 2018

  • Abraha, Michael; Gelfand, Ilya; Hamilton, Stephen K.
  • Dryad Digital Repository-Supplementary information for journal article at DOI: 10.1002/eap.1745, 1 XLSX file (19.03 Kb)
  • DOI: 10.5061/dryad.17g36j4