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Title: 3D DNA Crystals and Nanotechnology

Abstract

DNA's molecular recognition properties have made it one of the most widely used biomacromolecular construction materials. The programmed assembly of DNA oligonucleotides has been used to create complex 2D and 3D self-assembled architectures and to guide the assembly of other molecules. The origins of DNA nanotechnology are rooted in the goal of assembling DNA molecules into designed periodic arrays, i.e., crystals. Here, we highlight several DNA crystal structures, the progress made in designing DNA crystals, and look at the current prospects and future directions of DNA crystals in nanotechnology.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
  2. New York Univ. (NYU), NY (United States). Department of Chemistry
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1437431
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0007991
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Crystals
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 2073-4352
Publisher:
MDPI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; DNA crystals; nanotechnology; crystal design

Citation Formats

Paukstelis, Paul, and Seeman, Nadrian. 3D DNA Crystals and Nanotechnology. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.3390/cryst6080097.
Paukstelis, Paul, & Seeman, Nadrian. 3D DNA Crystals and Nanotechnology. United States. doi:10.3390/cryst6080097.
Paukstelis, Paul, and Seeman, Nadrian. Thu . "3D DNA Crystals and Nanotechnology". United States. doi:10.3390/cryst6080097. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1437431.
@article{osti_1437431,
title = {3D DNA Crystals and Nanotechnology},
author = {Paukstelis, Paul and Seeman, Nadrian},
abstractNote = {DNA's molecular recognition properties have made it one of the most widely used biomacromolecular construction materials. The programmed assembly of DNA oligonucleotides has been used to create complex 2D and 3D self-assembled architectures and to guide the assembly of other molecules. The origins of DNA nanotechnology are rooted in the goal of assembling DNA molecules into designed periodic arrays, i.e., crystals. Here, we highlight several DNA crystal structures, the progress made in designing DNA crystals, and look at the current prospects and future directions of DNA crystals in nanotechnology.},
doi = {10.3390/cryst6080097},
journal = {Crystals},
number = 8,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {8}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 5 works
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Works referenced in this record:

DNA-guided crystallization of colloidal nanoparticles
journal, January 2008

  • Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew M.; van der Lelie, Daniel
  • Nature, Vol. 451, Issue 7178, p. 549-552
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DNA-programmable nanoparticle crystallization
journal, January 2008

  • Park, Sung Yong; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K. R.; Lee, Byeongdu
  • Nature, Vol. 451, Issue 7178, p. 553-556
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