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Title: Bursting at the Seams: Rippled Monolayer Bismuth on NbSe 2

Bismuth, one of the heaviest semimetals in nature, ignited the interest of the materials-physics community for its potential impact on topological quantum-material systems that utilize its strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and unique orbital hybridization. In particular, recent theoretical predictions of unique topological and superconducting properties of thin bismuth films and interfaces prompted intense research on the growth of sub- to a few monolayers of bismuth on different substrates. Similar to bulk rhombohedral bismuth, the initial growth of bismuth films on most substrates results in buckled bilayers that either grow in the (111) or (110) directions, with a lattice constant close to that of bulk Bi. By contrast, in this paper we show a new growth pattern for bismuth monolayers on NbSe 2. We find that the initial growth of Bi can form a strongly bonded commensurate layer, resulting in a compressively strained two-dimensional triangular lattice. A unique pattern of 1D ripples and domain walls is observed. The single layer of bismuth also introduces strong marks on the electronic properties at the surface.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [4] ;  [5]
  1. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES); Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Geballe Lab. for Advanced Materials; Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics
  2. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Geballe Lab. for Advanced Materials; Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics
  3. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  4. Max Planck Inst. for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany)
  5. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES); Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Geballe Lab. for Advanced Materials; Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Physics
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science Advances
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 2375-2548
Publisher:
AAAS
Research Org:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE
OSTI Identifier:
1430225

Fang, Alan, Adamo, Carolina, Jia, Shuang, Cava, Robert J., Wu, Shu-Chun, Felser, Claudia, and Kapitulnik, Aharon. Bursting at the Seams: Rippled Monolayer Bismuth on NbSe2. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aaq0330.
Fang, Alan, Adamo, Carolina, Jia, Shuang, Cava, Robert J., Wu, Shu-Chun, Felser, Claudia, & Kapitulnik, Aharon. Bursting at the Seams: Rippled Monolayer Bismuth on NbSe2. United States. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aaq0330.
Fang, Alan, Adamo, Carolina, Jia, Shuang, Cava, Robert J., Wu, Shu-Chun, Felser, Claudia, and Kapitulnik, Aharon. 2018. "Bursting at the Seams: Rippled Monolayer Bismuth on NbSe2". United States. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aaq0330. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1430225.
@article{osti_1430225,
title = {Bursting at the Seams: Rippled Monolayer Bismuth on NbSe2},
author = {Fang, Alan and Adamo, Carolina and Jia, Shuang and Cava, Robert J. and Wu, Shu-Chun and Felser, Claudia and Kapitulnik, Aharon},
abstractNote = {Bismuth, one of the heaviest semimetals in nature, ignited the interest of the materials-physics community for its potential impact on topological quantum-material systems that utilize its strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and unique orbital hybridization. In particular, recent theoretical predictions of unique topological and superconducting properties of thin bismuth films and interfaces prompted intense research on the growth of sub- to a few monolayers of bismuth on different substrates. Similar to bulk rhombohedral bismuth, the initial growth of bismuth films on most substrates results in buckled bilayers that either grow in the (111) or (110) directions, with a lattice constant close to that of bulk Bi. By contrast, in this paper we show a new growth pattern for bismuth monolayers on NbSe2. We find that the initial growth of Bi can form a strongly bonded commensurate layer, resulting in a compressively strained two-dimensional triangular lattice. A unique pattern of 1D ripples and domain walls is observed. The single layer of bismuth also introduces strong marks on the electronic properties at the surface.},
doi = {10.1126/sciadv.aaq0330},
journal = {Science Advances},
number = 4,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}

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