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Title: Role of Surface Friction on Shallow Nonprecipitating Convection

Abstract

The role of surface friction on shallow nonprecipitating convection is investigated using a series of large-eddy simulations with varying surface friction velocity and with a cloud identification algorithm. As surface friction intensifies, convective rolls dominate over convective cells and secondary overturning circulation becomes stronger in the subcloud layer, thus transporting more moisture upward and more heat downward between the subcloud and cloud layers. Identifying individual clouds, using the identification algorithm based on a three-dimensional topological analysis, reveals that intensified surface friction increases the number of clouds and the degree of tilting in the downstream direction. Highly intensified surface friction increases wind shear across the cloud base and induces cloud tilting, which leads to a vertically parabolic profile of liquid water mixing ratio instead of the classical two-layer structure (conditionally unstable and trade inversion layers). Furthermore, cloud tilting induces more cloud cover and more cloud mass flux much above the cloud base (e.g., 0.8 < z < 1.2 km), but less cloud cover and less cloud mass flux in the upper cloud layer (e.g., z > 1.2 km) because of increased lateral entrainment rate. Similarly, profiles of directly measured entrainment and detrainment rates show that detrainment in the lower cloud layermore » becomes smaller with stronger surface friction.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York, and Institute for Basic Science Center for Climate Physics, Pusan National University, Busan, South Korea
  2. School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
  3. Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, and Earth Institute, Columbia University, New York, New York
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1415522
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1541820
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0014203; SC0011094
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences Journal Volume: 75 Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-4928
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences

Citation Formats

Park, Seung-Bu, Böing, Steven, and Gentine, Pierre. Role of Surface Friction on Shallow Nonprecipitating Convection. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1175/JAS-D-17-0106.1.
Park, Seung-Bu, Böing, Steven, & Gentine, Pierre. Role of Surface Friction on Shallow Nonprecipitating Convection. United States. doi:10.1175/JAS-D-17-0106.1.
Park, Seung-Bu, Böing, Steven, and Gentine, Pierre. Mon . "Role of Surface Friction on Shallow Nonprecipitating Convection". United States. doi:10.1175/JAS-D-17-0106.1.
@article{osti_1415522,
title = {Role of Surface Friction on Shallow Nonprecipitating Convection},
author = {Park, Seung-Bu and Böing, Steven and Gentine, Pierre},
abstractNote = {The role of surface friction on shallow nonprecipitating convection is investigated using a series of large-eddy simulations with varying surface friction velocity and with a cloud identification algorithm. As surface friction intensifies, convective rolls dominate over convective cells and secondary overturning circulation becomes stronger in the subcloud layer, thus transporting more moisture upward and more heat downward between the subcloud and cloud layers. Identifying individual clouds, using the identification algorithm based on a three-dimensional topological analysis, reveals that intensified surface friction increases the number of clouds and the degree of tilting in the downstream direction. Highly intensified surface friction increases wind shear across the cloud base and induces cloud tilting, which leads to a vertically parabolic profile of liquid water mixing ratio instead of the classical two-layer structure (conditionally unstable and trade inversion layers). Furthermore, cloud tilting induces more cloud cover and more cloud mass flux much above the cloud base (e.g., 0.8 < z < 1.2 km), but less cloud cover and less cloud mass flux in the upper cloud layer (e.g., z > 1.2 km) because of increased lateral entrainment rate. Similarly, profiles of directly measured entrainment and detrainment rates show that detrainment in the lower cloud layer becomes smaller with stronger surface friction.},
doi = {10.1175/JAS-D-17-0106.1},
journal = {Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences},
number = 1,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1175/JAS-D-17-0106.1

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1 work
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