skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Beryllium Laboratory Analysis--The Regulations May Drive the Science

Beryllium has many industry-specific applications, such as medical X-ray windows for diagnostic equipment, nuclear reactors, aerospace applications, precision instrumentation, and other consumer products for which lightness and rigidity is essential. According to the National Toxicology Program, beryllium oxide (BeO) is one of the most significant beryllium compounds in production. Although beryllium and its compounds have a wide array of beneficial uses, due to its unique properties it is not an ideal metal to be used in all situations. Exposure to beryllium is linked to beryllium sensitization and Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD), which is incurable, debilitating, and potentially fatal. The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies beryllium and beryllium compounds as “carcinogenic to humans” (Group I), and EPA classifies beryllium as a likely human carcinogen, the lung being the primary target organ. Laboratory analysis for beryllium samples has always presented a challenge to the analytical community. While most metals of interest to industrial hygienists have occupational exposure limits (OELs) in milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m 3), the beryllium OELs are in micrograms per cubic meter (μg/m3). Some regulatory agencies have recently published beryllium OELs so low that in some cases a laboratory limit of detection (LOD) in nanograms (ng) ismore » required. For most substances, science drives the regulations, but for beryllium, regulations appear to be driving science to develop laboratory analytical methods that can adequately support the proposed OELs. (EPA has issued guidelines regarding ambient and community airborne beryllium exposure, but this article focuses on beryllium from an occupational exposure perspective.)« less
Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Security Technologies, LLC, Mercury, NV (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
DOE/NV/25946-3234
Journal ID: ISSN 0049-2752; TRN: US1800096
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25946
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Synergist
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2017; Journal Issue: Aug; Journal ID: ISSN 0049-2752
Publisher:
American Industrial Hygiene Association
Research Org:
Nevada Test Site/National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; beryllium; regulations; occupational exposure; laboratories
OSTI Identifier:
1391857

Taruru, Seuri K. Beryllium Laboratory Analysis--The Regulations May Drive the Science. United States: N. p., Web.
Taruru, Seuri K. Beryllium Laboratory Analysis--The Regulations May Drive the Science. United States.
Taruru, Seuri K. 2017. "Beryllium Laboratory Analysis--The Regulations May Drive the Science". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1391857.
@article{osti_1391857,
title = {Beryllium Laboratory Analysis--The Regulations May Drive the Science},
author = {Taruru, Seuri K},
abstractNote = {Beryllium has many industry-specific applications, such as medical X-ray windows for diagnostic equipment, nuclear reactors, aerospace applications, precision instrumentation, and other consumer products for which lightness and rigidity is essential. According to the National Toxicology Program, beryllium oxide (BeO) is one of the most significant beryllium compounds in production. Although beryllium and its compounds have a wide array of beneficial uses, due to its unique properties it is not an ideal metal to be used in all situations. Exposure to beryllium is linked to beryllium sensitization and Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD), which is incurable, debilitating, and potentially fatal. The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies beryllium and beryllium compounds as “carcinogenic to humans” (Group I), and EPA classifies beryllium as a likely human carcinogen, the lung being the primary target organ. Laboratory analysis for beryllium samples has always presented a challenge to the analytical community. While most metals of interest to industrial hygienists have occupational exposure limits (OELs) in milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3), the beryllium OELs are in micrograms per cubic meter (μg/m3). Some regulatory agencies have recently published beryllium OELs so low that in some cases a laboratory limit of detection (LOD) in nanograms (ng) is required. For most substances, science drives the regulations, but for beryllium, regulations appear to be driving science to develop laboratory analytical methods that can adequately support the proposed OELs. (EPA has issued guidelines regarding ambient and community airborne beryllium exposure, but this article focuses on beryllium from an occupational exposure perspective.)},
doi = {},
journal = {Synergist},
number = Aug,
volume = 2017,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {8}
}