skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Representation of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1) CAM4-chem within the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative (CCMI)

The Community Earth System Model (CESM1) CAM4-chem has been used to perform the Chemistry Climate Model Initiative (CCMI) reference and sensitivity simulations. In this model, the Community Atmospheric Model version 4 (CAM4) is fully coupled to tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Details and specifics of each configuration, including new developments and improvements are described. CESM1 CAM4-chem is a low-top model that reaches up to approximately 40 km and uses a horizontal resolution of 1.9° latitude and 2.5° longitude. For the specified dynamics experiments, the model is nudged to Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis. We summarize the performance of the three reference simulations suggested by CCMI, with a focus on the last 15 years of the simulation when most observations are available. Comparisons with selected data sets are employed to demonstrate the general performance of the model. We highlight new data sets that are suited for multi-model evaluation studies. Most important improvements of the model are the treatment of stratospheric aerosols and the corresponding adjustments for radiation and optics, the updated chemistry scheme including improved polar chemistry and stratospheric dynamics and improved dry deposition rates. These updates lead to a very good representation of tropospheric ozone within 20 %more » of values from available observations for most regions. In particular, the trend and magnitude of surface ozone is much improved compared to earlier versions of the model. Furthermore, stratospheric column ozone of the Southern Hemisphere in winter and spring is reasonably well represented. In conclusion, all experiments still underestimate CO most significantly in Northern Hemisphere spring and show a significant underestimation of hydrocarbons based on surface observations.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [4] ;  [4]
  1. National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)
  2. The Univ. of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)
  3. National Institute for Environmental Studies, Ibaraki (Japan)
  4. Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Geoscientific Model Development (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Geoscientific Model Development (Online); Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 1991-9603
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1375718

Tilmes, Simone, Lamarque, Jean -Francois, Emmons, Louisa K., Kinnison, Doug E., Marsh, Dan, Garcia, Rolando R., Smith, Anne K., Neely, Ryan R., Conley, Andrew, Vitt, Francis, Val Martin, Maria, Tanimoto, Hiroshi, Simpson, Isobel, Blake, Don R., and Blake, Nicola. Representation of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1) CAM4-chem within the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative (CCMI). United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.5194/gmd-9-1853-2016.
Tilmes, Simone, Lamarque, Jean -Francois, Emmons, Louisa K., Kinnison, Doug E., Marsh, Dan, Garcia, Rolando R., Smith, Anne K., Neely, Ryan R., Conley, Andrew, Vitt, Francis, Val Martin, Maria, Tanimoto, Hiroshi, Simpson, Isobel, Blake, Don R., & Blake, Nicola. Representation of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1) CAM4-chem within the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative (CCMI). United States. doi:10.5194/gmd-9-1853-2016.
Tilmes, Simone, Lamarque, Jean -Francois, Emmons, Louisa K., Kinnison, Doug E., Marsh, Dan, Garcia, Rolando R., Smith, Anne K., Neely, Ryan R., Conley, Andrew, Vitt, Francis, Val Martin, Maria, Tanimoto, Hiroshi, Simpson, Isobel, Blake, Don R., and Blake, Nicola. 2016. "Representation of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1) CAM4-chem within the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative (CCMI)". United States. doi:10.5194/gmd-9-1853-2016. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375718.
@article{osti_1375718,
title = {Representation of the Community Earth System Model (CESM1) CAM4-chem within the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative (CCMI)},
author = {Tilmes, Simone and Lamarque, Jean -Francois and Emmons, Louisa K. and Kinnison, Doug E. and Marsh, Dan and Garcia, Rolando R. and Smith, Anne K. and Neely, Ryan R. and Conley, Andrew and Vitt, Francis and Val Martin, Maria and Tanimoto, Hiroshi and Simpson, Isobel and Blake, Don R. and Blake, Nicola},
abstractNote = {The Community Earth System Model (CESM1) CAM4-chem has been used to perform the Chemistry Climate Model Initiative (CCMI) reference and sensitivity simulations. In this model, the Community Atmospheric Model version 4 (CAM4) is fully coupled to tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Details and specifics of each configuration, including new developments and improvements are described. CESM1 CAM4-chem is a low-top model that reaches up to approximately 40 km and uses a horizontal resolution of 1.9° latitude and 2.5° longitude. For the specified dynamics experiments, the model is nudged to Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis. We summarize the performance of the three reference simulations suggested by CCMI, with a focus on the last 15 years of the simulation when most observations are available. Comparisons with selected data sets are employed to demonstrate the general performance of the model. We highlight new data sets that are suited for multi-model evaluation studies. Most important improvements of the model are the treatment of stratospheric aerosols and the corresponding adjustments for radiation and optics, the updated chemistry scheme including improved polar chemistry and stratospheric dynamics and improved dry deposition rates. These updates lead to a very good representation of tropospheric ozone within 20 % of values from available observations for most regions. In particular, the trend and magnitude of surface ozone is much improved compared to earlier versions of the model. Furthermore, stratospheric column ozone of the Southern Hemisphere in winter and spring is reasonably well represented. In conclusion, all experiments still underestimate CO most significantly in Northern Hemisphere spring and show a significant underestimation of hydrocarbons based on surface observations.},
doi = {10.5194/gmd-9-1853-2016},
journal = {Geoscientific Model Development (Online)},
number = 5,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {5}
}