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Title: A molecular perspective on the limits of life: Enzymes under pressure

Abstract

From a purely operational standpoint, the existence of microbes that can grow under extreme conditions, or “extremophiles”, leads to the question of how the molecules making up these microbes can maintain both their structure and function. Furthermore, while microbes that live under extremes of temperature have been heavily studied, those that live under extremes of pressure have been neglected, in part due to the difficulty of collecting samples and performing experiments under the ambient conditions of the microbe. But, thermodynamic arguments imply that the effects of pressure might lead to different organismal solutions than from the effects of temperature. Observationally, some of these solutions might be in the condensed matter properties of the intracellular milieu in addition to genetic modi1cations of the macromolecules or repair mechanisms for the macromolecules. Here, the effects of pressure on enzymes, which are proteins essential for the growth and reproduction of an organism, and some adaptations against these effects are reviewed and ampli1ed by the results from molecular dynamics simulations. Our aim is to provide biological background for soft matter studies of these systems under pressure.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1]
  1. Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  2. Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States). Geophysical Lab.
  3. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography
  4. Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States). Geophysical Lab.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington, DC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); National Institutes of Health (NIH); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1361517
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1364607
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA0002006
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Condensed Matter Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1607-324X
Publisher:
Institute for Condensed Matter Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; enzymes; hydrostatic; intracellular environment

Citation Formats

Huang, Q., Tran, K. N., Rodgers, J. M., Bartlett, D. H., Hemley, R. J., and Ichiye, T. A molecular perspective on the limits of life: Enzymes under pressure. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.5488/CMP.19.22801.
Huang, Q., Tran, K. N., Rodgers, J. M., Bartlett, D. H., Hemley, R. J., & Ichiye, T. A molecular perspective on the limits of life: Enzymes under pressure. United States. doi:10.5488/CMP.19.22801.
Huang, Q., Tran, K. N., Rodgers, J. M., Bartlett, D. H., Hemley, R. J., and Ichiye, T. Tue . "A molecular perspective on the limits of life: Enzymes under pressure". United States. doi:10.5488/CMP.19.22801. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1361517.
@article{osti_1361517,
title = {A molecular perspective on the limits of life: Enzymes under pressure},
author = {Huang, Q. and Tran, K. N. and Rodgers, J. M. and Bartlett, D. H. and Hemley, R. J. and Ichiye, T.},
abstractNote = {From a purely operational standpoint, the existence of microbes that can grow under extreme conditions, or “extremophiles”, leads to the question of how the molecules making up these microbes can maintain both their structure and function. Furthermore, while microbes that live under extremes of temperature have been heavily studied, those that live under extremes of pressure have been neglected, in part due to the difficulty of collecting samples and performing experiments under the ambient conditions of the microbe. But, thermodynamic arguments imply that the effects of pressure might lead to different organismal solutions than from the effects of temperature. Observationally, some of these solutions might be in the condensed matter properties of the intracellular milieu in addition to genetic modi1cations of the macromolecules or repair mechanisms for the macromolecules. Here, the effects of pressure on enzymes, which are proteins essential for the growth and reproduction of an organism, and some adaptations against these effects are reviewed and ampli1ed by the results from molecular dynamics simulations. Our aim is to provide biological background for soft matter studies of these systems under pressure.},
doi = {10.5488/CMP.19.22801},
journal = {Condensed Matter Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {3}
}

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