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Title: A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility for a fast-track path to DEMO

An accelerated fusion energy development program, a “fast-track” approach, requires developing an understanding of fusion nuclear science (FNS) in parallel with research on ITER to study burning plasmas. A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) in parallel with ITER provides the capability to resolve FNS feasibility issues related to power extraction, tritium fuel sustainability, and reliability, and to begin construction of DEMO upon the achievement of Q~10 in ITER. Fusion nuclear components, including the first wall (FW)/blanket, divertor, heating/fueling systems, etc. are complex systems with many inter-related functions and different materials, fluids, and physical interfaces. These in-vessel nuclear components must operate continuously and reliably with: (a) Plasma exposure, surface particle & radiation loads, (b) High energy 2 neutron fluxes and their interactions in materials (e.g. peaked volumetric heating with steep gradients, tritium production, activation, atomic displacements, gas production, etc.), (c) Strong magnetic fields with temporal and spatial variations (electromagnetic coupling to the plasma including off-normal events like disruptions), and (d) a High temperature, high vacuum, chemically active environment. While many of these conditions and effects are being studied with separate and multiple effect experimental test stands and modeling, fusion nuclear conditions cannot be completely simulated outside the fusion environment. This meansmore » there are many new multi-physics, multi-scale phenomena and synergistic effects yet to be discovered and accounted for in the understanding, design and operation of fusion as a self-sustaining, energy producing system, and significant experimentation and operational experience in a true fusion environment is an essential requirement. In the following sections we discuss the FNSF objectives, describe the facility requirements and a facility concept and operation approach that can accomplish those objectives, and assess the readiness to construct with respect to several key FNSF issues: materials, steady-state operation, disruptions, power exhaust, and breeding blanket. Finally we present our conclusions.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ; ; ; ; ;  [2] ; ;  [3] ; ; ; ;  [2]
  1. General Atomics, La Jolla, CA (United States)
  2. University of California, Los Angeles
  3. University of Wisconsin Madison
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
FC02-04ER54698
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Fusion Engineering and Design
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 7-8; Journal ID: ISSN 0920-3796
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
OSTI Identifier:
1358207

Garofalo, Andrea M., Abdou, M., Canik, John M., Chan, Vincent S., Hyatt, Alan W., Hill, David N., Morley, N. B., Navratil, Gerald A., Sawan, M. E., Taylor, Tony S., Wong, Clement P.C., Wu, Wen, and Ying, A.. A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility for a fast-track path to DEMO. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.fusengdes.2014.03.055.
Garofalo, Andrea M., Abdou, M., Canik, John M., Chan, Vincent S., Hyatt, Alan W., Hill, David N., Morley, N. B., Navratil, Gerald A., Sawan, M. E., Taylor, Tony S., Wong, Clement P.C., Wu, Wen, & Ying, A.. A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility for a fast-track path to DEMO. United States. doi:10.1016/j.fusengdes.2014.03.055.
Garofalo, Andrea M., Abdou, M., Canik, John M., Chan, Vincent S., Hyatt, Alan W., Hill, David N., Morley, N. B., Navratil, Gerald A., Sawan, M. E., Taylor, Tony S., Wong, Clement P.C., Wu, Wen, and Ying, A.. 2014. "A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility for a fast-track path to DEMO". United States. doi:10.1016/j.fusengdes.2014.03.055. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1358207.
@article{osti_1358207,
title = {A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility for a fast-track path to DEMO},
author = {Garofalo, Andrea M. and Abdou, M. and Canik, John M. and Chan, Vincent S. and Hyatt, Alan W. and Hill, David N. and Morley, N. B. and Navratil, Gerald A. and Sawan, M. E. and Taylor, Tony S. and Wong, Clement P.C. and Wu, Wen and Ying, A.},
abstractNote = {An accelerated fusion energy development program, a “fast-track” approach, requires developing an understanding of fusion nuclear science (FNS) in parallel with research on ITER to study burning plasmas. A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) in parallel with ITER provides the capability to resolve FNS feasibility issues related to power extraction, tritium fuel sustainability, and reliability, and to begin construction of DEMO upon the achievement of Q~10 in ITER. Fusion nuclear components, including the first wall (FW)/blanket, divertor, heating/fueling systems, etc. are complex systems with many inter-related functions and different materials, fluids, and physical interfaces. These in-vessel nuclear components must operate continuously and reliably with: (a) Plasma exposure, surface particle & radiation loads, (b) High energy 2 neutron fluxes and their interactions in materials (e.g. peaked volumetric heating with steep gradients, tritium production, activation, atomic displacements, gas production, etc.), (c) Strong magnetic fields with temporal and spatial variations (electromagnetic coupling to the plasma including off-normal events like disruptions), and (d) a High temperature, high vacuum, chemically active environment. While many of these conditions and effects are being studied with separate and multiple effect experimental test stands and modeling, fusion nuclear conditions cannot be completely simulated outside the fusion environment. This means there are many new multi-physics, multi-scale phenomena and synergistic effects yet to be discovered and accounted for in the understanding, design and operation of fusion as a self-sustaining, energy producing system, and significant experimentation and operational experience in a true fusion environment is an essential requirement. In the following sections we discuss the FNSF objectives, describe the facility requirements and a facility concept and operation approach that can accomplish those objectives, and assess the readiness to construct with respect to several key FNSF issues: materials, steady-state operation, disruptions, power exhaust, and breeding blanket. Finally we present our conclusions.},
doi = {10.1016/j.fusengdes.2014.03.055},
journal = {Fusion Engineering and Design},
number = 7-8,
volume = 89,
place = {United States},
year = {2014},
month = {10}
}