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Title: Dynamics of microbial community composition and soil organic carbon mineralization in soil following addition of pyrogenic and fresh organic matter

Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) additions to soils can have large impacts on soil organic carbon (SOC) cycling. As the soil microbial community drives SOC fluxes, understanding how PyOM additions affect soil microbes is essential to understanding how PyOM affects SOC. We studied SOC dynamics and surveyed soil bacterial communities after OM additions in a field experiment. We produced and mixed in either 350 °C corn stover PyOM or an equivalent initial amount of dried corn stover to a Typic Fragiudept soil. Stover increased SOC-derived and total CO 2 fluxes (up to 6x), and caused rapid and persistent changes in bacterial community composition over 82 days. In contrast, PyOM only temporarily increased total soil CO 2 fluxes (up to 2x) and caused fewer changes in bacterial community composition. Of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that increased in response to PyOM additions, 70% also responded to stover additions. These OTUs likely thrive on easily mineralizable carbon (C) that is found both in stover and, to a lesser extent, in PyOM. In contrast, we also identified unique PyOM responders, which may respond to substrates such as polyaromatic C. In particular, members of Gemmatimonadetes tended to increase in relative abundance in response to PyOMmore » but not to fresh organic matter. As a result, we identify taxa to target for future investigations of the mechanistic underpinnings of ecological phenomena associated with PyOM additions to soil.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2]
  1. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
  2. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-705339
Journal ID: ISSN 1751-7362
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
The ISME Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 1751-7362
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Research Org:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1357333

Whitman, Thea, Pepe-Ranney, Charles, Enders, Akio, Koechli, Chantal, Campbell, Ashley, Buckley, Daniel H., and Lehmann, Johannes. Dynamics of microbial community composition and soil organic carbon mineralization in soil following addition of pyrogenic and fresh organic matter. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.68.
Whitman, Thea, Pepe-Ranney, Charles, Enders, Akio, Koechli, Chantal, Campbell, Ashley, Buckley, Daniel H., & Lehmann, Johannes. Dynamics of microbial community composition and soil organic carbon mineralization in soil following addition of pyrogenic and fresh organic matter. United States. doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.68.
Whitman, Thea, Pepe-Ranney, Charles, Enders, Akio, Koechli, Chantal, Campbell, Ashley, Buckley, Daniel H., and Lehmann, Johannes. 2016. "Dynamics of microbial community composition and soil organic carbon mineralization in soil following addition of pyrogenic and fresh organic matter". United States. doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.68. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1357333.
@article{osti_1357333,
title = {Dynamics of microbial community composition and soil organic carbon mineralization in soil following addition of pyrogenic and fresh organic matter},
author = {Whitman, Thea and Pepe-Ranney, Charles and Enders, Akio and Koechli, Chantal and Campbell, Ashley and Buckley, Daniel H. and Lehmann, Johannes},
abstractNote = {Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) additions to soils can have large impacts on soil organic carbon (SOC) cycling. As the soil microbial community drives SOC fluxes, understanding how PyOM additions affect soil microbes is essential to understanding how PyOM affects SOC. We studied SOC dynamics and surveyed soil bacterial communities after OM additions in a field experiment. We produced and mixed in either 350 °C corn stover PyOM or an equivalent initial amount of dried corn stover to a Typic Fragiudept soil. Stover increased SOC-derived and total CO2 fluxes (up to 6x), and caused rapid and persistent changes in bacterial community composition over 82 days. In contrast, PyOM only temporarily increased total soil CO2 fluxes (up to 2x) and caused fewer changes in bacterial community composition. Of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that increased in response to PyOM additions, 70% also responded to stover additions. These OTUs likely thrive on easily mineralizable carbon (C) that is found both in stover and, to a lesser extent, in PyOM. In contrast, we also identified unique PyOM responders, which may respond to substrates such as polyaromatic C. In particular, members of Gemmatimonadetes tended to increase in relative abundance in response to PyOM but not to fresh organic matter. As a result, we identify taxa to target for future investigations of the mechanistic underpinnings of ecological phenomena associated with PyOM additions to soil.},
doi = {10.1038/ismej.2016.68},
journal = {The ISME Journal},
number = 12,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {4}
}