skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Kingella kingae expresses four structurally distinct polysaccharide capsules that differ in their correlation with invasive disease

Kingella kingae is an encapsulated gram-negative organism that is a common cause of osteoarticular infections in young children. In earlier work, we identified a glycosyltransferase gene called csaA that is necessary for synthesis of the [3)-β-GalpNAc-(1→5)-β-Kdop-(2→] polysaccharide capsule (type a) in K. kingae strain 269–492. In the current study, we analyzed a large collection of invasive and carrier isolates from Israel and found that csaA was present in only 47% of the isolates. Further examination of this collection using primers based on the sequence that flanks csaA revealed three additional gene clusters (designated the csb, csc, and csd loci), all encoding predicted glycosyltransferases. The csb locus contains the csbA, csbB, and csbC genes and is associated with a capsule that is a polymer of [6)-α-GlcpNAc-(1→5)-β-(8-OAc)Kdop-(2→] (type b). The csc locus contains the cscA, cscB, and cscC genes and is associated with a capsule that is a polymer of [3)-β-Ribf-(1→2)-β-Ribf-(1→2)-β-Ribf-(1→4)-β-Kdop-(2→] (type c). The csd locus contains the csdA, csdB, and csdC genes and is associated with a capsule that is a polymer of [P-(O→3)[β-Galp-(1→4)]-β-GlcpNAc-(1→3)-α-GlcpNAc-1-] (type d). Introduction of the csa, csb, csc, and csd loci into strain KK01Δcsa, a strain 269–492 derivative that lacks the native csaA gene, was sufficient tomore » produce the type a capsule, type b capsule, type c capsule, and type d capsule, respectively, indicating that these loci are solely responsible for determining capsule type in K. kingae. Further analysis demonstrated that 96% of the invasive isolates express either the type a or type b capsule and that a disproportionate percentage of carrier isolates express the type c or type d capsule. Lastly, these results establish that there are at least four structurally distinct K. kingae capsule types and suggest that capsule type plays an important role in promoting K. kingae invasive disease« less
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [3] ; ORCiD logo [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [3] ;  [2] ;  [6]
  1. Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)
  2. The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)
  4. Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)
  5. Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)
  6. Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-93ER20097
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
PLoS Pathogens
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1553-7374
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Research Org:
Univ. of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc., Athens, GA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1336892
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1365836

Starr, Kimberly F., Porsch, Eric A., Seed, Patrick C., Heiss, Christian, Naran, Radnaa, Forsberg, L. Scott, Amit, Uri, Yagupsky, Pablo, Azadi, Parastoo, St. Geme, III, Joseph W., and Mitchell, Timothy J.. Kingella kingae expresses four structurally distinct polysaccharide capsules that differ in their correlation with invasive disease. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1005944.
Starr, Kimberly F., Porsch, Eric A., Seed, Patrick C., Heiss, Christian, Naran, Radnaa, Forsberg, L. Scott, Amit, Uri, Yagupsky, Pablo, Azadi, Parastoo, St. Geme, III, Joseph W., & Mitchell, Timothy J.. Kingella kingae expresses four structurally distinct polysaccharide capsules that differ in their correlation with invasive disease. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1005944.
Starr, Kimberly F., Porsch, Eric A., Seed, Patrick C., Heiss, Christian, Naran, Radnaa, Forsberg, L. Scott, Amit, Uri, Yagupsky, Pablo, Azadi, Parastoo, St. Geme, III, Joseph W., and Mitchell, Timothy J.. 2016. "Kingella kingae expresses four structurally distinct polysaccharide capsules that differ in their correlation with invasive disease". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1005944.
@article{osti_1336892,
title = {Kingella kingae expresses four structurally distinct polysaccharide capsules that differ in their correlation with invasive disease},
author = {Starr, Kimberly F. and Porsch, Eric A. and Seed, Patrick C. and Heiss, Christian and Naran, Radnaa and Forsberg, L. Scott and Amit, Uri and Yagupsky, Pablo and Azadi, Parastoo and St. Geme, III, Joseph W. and Mitchell, Timothy J.},
abstractNote = {Kingella kingae is an encapsulated gram-negative organism that is a common cause of osteoarticular infections in young children. In earlier work, we identified a glycosyltransferase gene called csaA that is necessary for synthesis of the [3)-β-GalpNAc-(1→5)-β-Kdop-(2→] polysaccharide capsule (type a) in K. kingae strain 269–492. In the current study, we analyzed a large collection of invasive and carrier isolates from Israel and found that csaA was present in only 47% of the isolates. Further examination of this collection using primers based on the sequence that flanks csaA revealed three additional gene clusters (designated the csb, csc, and csd loci), all encoding predicted glycosyltransferases. The csb locus contains the csbA, csbB, and csbC genes and is associated with a capsule that is a polymer of [6)-α-GlcpNAc-(1→5)-β-(8-OAc)Kdop-(2→] (type b). The csc locus contains the cscA, cscB, and cscC genes and is associated with a capsule that is a polymer of [3)-β-Ribf-(1→2)-β-Ribf-(1→2)-β-Ribf-(1→4)-β-Kdop-(2→] (type c). The csd locus contains the csdA, csdB, and csdC genes and is associated with a capsule that is a polymer of [P-(O→3)[β-Galp-(1→4)]-β-GlcpNAc-(1→3)-α-GlcpNAc-1-] (type d). Introduction of the csa, csb, csc, and csd loci into strain KK01Δcsa, a strain 269–492 derivative that lacks the native csaA gene, was sufficient to produce the type a capsule, type b capsule, type c capsule, and type d capsule, respectively, indicating that these loci are solely responsible for determining capsule type in K. kingae. Further analysis demonstrated that 96% of the invasive isolates express either the type a or type b capsule and that a disproportionate percentage of carrier isolates express the type c or type d capsule. Lastly, these results establish that there are at least four structurally distinct K. kingae capsule types and suggest that capsule type plays an important role in promoting K. kingae invasive disease},
doi = {10.1371/journal.ppat.1005944},
journal = {PLoS Pathogens},
number = 10,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {10}
}