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Title: Dynamic scan control in STEM: spiral scans

Abstract

Here, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has emerged as one of the foremost techniques to analyze materials at atomic resolution. However, two practical difficulties inherent to STEM imaging are: radiation damage imparted by the electron beam, which can potentially damage or otherwise modify the specimen and slow-scan image acquisition, which limits the ability to capture dynamic changes at high temporal resolution. Furthermore, due in part to scan flyback corrections, typical raster scan methods result in an uneven distribution of dose across the scanned area. A method to allow extremely fast scanning with a uniform residence time would enable imaging at low electron doses, ameliorating radiation damage and at the same time permitting image acquisition at higher frame-rates while maintaining atomic resolution. The practical complication is that rastering the STEM probe at higher speeds causes significant image distortions. Non-square scan patterns provide a solution to this dilemma and can be tailored for low dose imaging conditions. Here, we develop a method for imaging with alternative scan patterns and investigate their performance at very high scan speeds. A general analysis for spiral scanning is presented here for the following spiral scan functions: Archimedean, Fermat, and constant linear velocity spirals, which were testedmore » for STEM imaging. The quality of spiral scan STEM images is generally comparable with STEM images from conventional raster scans, and the dose uniformity can be improved.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1256773
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1263852
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Advanced Structural and Chemical Imaging
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Advanced Structural and Chemical Imaging Journal Volume: 2 Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2198-0926
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; aberration-corrected STEM; scan control; distortion; spiral scan

Citation Formats

Sang, Xiahan, Lupini, Andrew R., Unocic, Raymond R., Chi, Miaofang, Borisevich, Albina Y., Kalinin, Sergei V., Endeve, Eirik, Archibald, Richard K., and Jesse, Stephen. Dynamic scan control in STEM: spiral scans. Germany: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1186/s40679-016-0020-3.
Sang, Xiahan, Lupini, Andrew R., Unocic, Raymond R., Chi, Miaofang, Borisevich, Albina Y., Kalinin, Sergei V., Endeve, Eirik, Archibald, Richard K., & Jesse, Stephen. Dynamic scan control in STEM: spiral scans. Germany. doi:10.1186/s40679-016-0020-3.
Sang, Xiahan, Lupini, Andrew R., Unocic, Raymond R., Chi, Miaofang, Borisevich, Albina Y., Kalinin, Sergei V., Endeve, Eirik, Archibald, Richard K., and Jesse, Stephen. Mon . "Dynamic scan control in STEM: spiral scans". Germany. doi:10.1186/s40679-016-0020-3.
@article{osti_1256773,
title = {Dynamic scan control in STEM: spiral scans},
author = {Sang, Xiahan and Lupini, Andrew R. and Unocic, Raymond R. and Chi, Miaofang and Borisevich, Albina Y. and Kalinin, Sergei V. and Endeve, Eirik and Archibald, Richard K. and Jesse, Stephen},
abstractNote = {Here, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has emerged as one of the foremost techniques to analyze materials at atomic resolution. However, two practical difficulties inherent to STEM imaging are: radiation damage imparted by the electron beam, which can potentially damage or otherwise modify the specimen and slow-scan image acquisition, which limits the ability to capture dynamic changes at high temporal resolution. Furthermore, due in part to scan flyback corrections, typical raster scan methods result in an uneven distribution of dose across the scanned area. A method to allow extremely fast scanning with a uniform residence time would enable imaging at low electron doses, ameliorating radiation damage and at the same time permitting image acquisition at higher frame-rates while maintaining atomic resolution. The practical complication is that rastering the STEM probe at higher speeds causes significant image distortions. Non-square scan patterns provide a solution to this dilemma and can be tailored for low dose imaging conditions. Here, we develop a method for imaging with alternative scan patterns and investigate their performance at very high scan speeds. A general analysis for spiral scanning is presented here for the following spiral scan functions: Archimedean, Fermat, and constant linear velocity spirals, which were tested for STEM imaging. The quality of spiral scan STEM images is generally comparable with STEM images from conventional raster scans, and the dose uniformity can be improved.},
doi = {10.1186/s40679-016-0020-3},
journal = {Advanced Structural and Chemical Imaging},
number = 1,
volume = 2,
place = {Germany},
year = {2016},
month = {6}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1186/s40679-016-0020-3

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