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Title: Pulsed voltage electrospray ion source and method for preventing analyte electrolysis

Abstract

An electrospray ion source and method of operation includes the application of pulsed voltage to prevent electrolysis of analytes with a low electrochemical potential. The electrospray ion source can include an emitter, a counter electrode, and a power supply. The emitter can include a liquid conduit, a primary working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, and a spray tip, where the liquid conduit and the working electrode are in liquid communication. The counter electrode can be proximate to, but separated from, the spray tip. The power system can supply voltage to the working electrode in the form of a pulse wave, where the pulse wave oscillates between at least an energized voltage and a relaxation voltage. The relaxation duration of the relaxation voltage can range from 1 millisecond to 35 milliseconds. The pulse duration of the energized voltage can be less than 1 millisecond and the frequency of the pulse wave can range from 30 to 800 Hz.

Inventors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Knoxville, TN
  2. Clinton, TN
Issue Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1034105
Patent Number(s):
8084735
Application Number:
12/431,461
Assignee:
UT-Battelle, LLC (Oak Ridge, TN)
Patent Classifications (CPCs):
H - ELECTRICITY H01 - BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS H01J - ELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Kertesz, Vilmos, and Van Berkel, Gary. Pulsed voltage electrospray ion source and method for preventing analyte electrolysis. United States: N. p., 2011. Web.
Kertesz, Vilmos, & Van Berkel, Gary. Pulsed voltage electrospray ion source and method for preventing analyte electrolysis. United States.
Kertesz, Vilmos, and Van Berkel, Gary. Tue . "Pulsed voltage electrospray ion source and method for preventing analyte electrolysis". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1034105.
@article{osti_1034105,
title = {Pulsed voltage electrospray ion source and method for preventing analyte electrolysis},
author = {Kertesz, Vilmos and Van Berkel, Gary},
abstractNote = {An electrospray ion source and method of operation includes the application of pulsed voltage to prevent electrolysis of analytes with a low electrochemical potential. The electrospray ion source can include an emitter, a counter electrode, and a power supply. The emitter can include a liquid conduit, a primary working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, and a spray tip, where the liquid conduit and the working electrode are in liquid communication. The counter electrode can be proximate to, but separated from, the spray tip. The power system can supply voltage to the working electrode in the form of a pulse wave, where the pulse wave oscillates between at least an energized voltage and a relaxation voltage. The relaxation duration of the relaxation voltage can range from 1 millisecond to 35 milliseconds. The pulse duration of the energized voltage can be less than 1 millisecond and the frequency of the pulse wave can range from 30 to 800 Hz.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {12}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

The use of AC potentials in electrospraying and electrospinning processes
journal, April 2004


Ionic liquid ion sources: suppression of electrochemical reactions using voltage alternation
journal, December 2004


Expanded use of a battery-powered two-electrode emitter cell for electrospray mass spectrometry
journal, July 2006


Sheathless capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry using a pulsed electrospray ionization source
journal, June 2006


AC electrospray biomaterials synthesis
journal, November 2005


Pulsed Electrospray for Mass Spectrometry
journal, October 2001


A New ac Electrospray Mechanism by Maxwell-Wagner Polarization and Capillary Resonance
journal, April 2004