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Title: Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune CW-5 Marsh incubation chamber experiment

Abstract

Critical military training and testing on lands along the nation’s coastal and estuarine shorelines are increasingly placed at risk because of encroachment pressures in surrounding areas, impairments due to other anthropogenic disturbances, and changes in climate and sea level. The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) intends to enhance and sustain its training and testing assets and also optimize its stewardship of natural resources through the development and application of an ecosystem-based management approach on DoD installations. To accomplish this goal, particularly for installations in estuarine/coastal environments, the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) launched the Defense Coastal/Estuarine Research Program (DCERP) as a 10-year effort at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune (MCBCL) in North Carolina. The results of the second 5 years of the program (DCERP2) are presented in the DCERP2 Final Report.There were four overarching objectives of DCERP2. The first objective was to understand the effects of climate change impacts, including warming temperatures, variability in the hydrological cycle, storm events, and sea level rise on the coastal ecosystems at MCBCL from observations and measurements made over the 10-year program. The second objective was to understand the carbon cycle of the coastal and terrestrial ecosystems at MCBCL through a highlymore » integrated sampling program. The third objective was to develop models, tools, and indicators to evaluate current and projected future ecosystem state changes and translate scientific findings into actionable information for installation managers. The last objective was to recommend adaptive management strategies to sustain ecosystem natural resources within the context of an active military installation.A goal of CW-5 was to measure the influence of salt marshes on N, P, and C in tidal creek channels. Salt marsh sediment microbial communities and vegetation may affect N, P, and C in creek water overlying the marsh during high tide; these concentration changes would subsequently alter the flux of N, P, and C in the tidal creek channel during low tide. The objective of this research was to measure the rate of concentration change in N, P, and C in a volume of water isolated on the marsh during high tide. This rate of concentration change can be extrapolated across a salt marsh surface to estimate the mass export of N, P, and C back to the tidal creek channel at low tide. Analysis of these data is provided in the CW-5 chapter of the DCERP2 Final Research Report.« less

Creator(s)/Author(s):
Publication Date:
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org.:
Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Defense Coastal/Estuarine Research Program (DCERP)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. DoD > Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) > Defense Coastal/Estuarine Research Program (DCERP)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
Keywords:
DCERP; SERDP; RESOURCE CONSERVATION; RC-2245
OSTI Identifier:
1602910
DOI:
10.15485/1602910

Citation Formats

Ensign, Scott. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune CW-5 Marsh incubation chamber experiment. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.15485/1602910.
Ensign, Scott. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune CW-5 Marsh incubation chamber experiment. United States. doi:10.15485/1602910.
Ensign, Scott. 2017. "Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune CW-5 Marsh incubation chamber experiment". United States. doi:10.15485/1602910. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1602910. Pub date:Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017
@article{osti_1602910,
title = {Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune CW-5 Marsh incubation chamber experiment},
author = {Ensign, Scott},
abstractNote = {Critical military training and testing on lands along the nation’s coastal and estuarine shorelines are increasingly placed at risk because of encroachment pressures in surrounding areas, impairments due to other anthropogenic disturbances, and changes in climate and sea level. The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) intends to enhance and sustain its training and testing assets and also optimize its stewardship of natural resources through the development and application of an ecosystem-based management approach on DoD installations. To accomplish this goal, particularly for installations in estuarine/coastal environments, the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) launched the Defense Coastal/Estuarine Research Program (DCERP) as a 10-year effort at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune (MCBCL) in North Carolina. The results of the second 5 years of the program (DCERP2) are presented in the DCERP2 Final Report.There were four overarching objectives of DCERP2. The first objective was to understand the effects of climate change impacts, including warming temperatures, variability in the hydrological cycle, storm events, and sea level rise on the coastal ecosystems at MCBCL from observations and measurements made over the 10-year program. The second objective was to understand the carbon cycle of the coastal and terrestrial ecosystems at MCBCL through a highly integrated sampling program. The third objective was to develop models, tools, and indicators to evaluate current and projected future ecosystem state changes and translate scientific findings into actionable information for installation managers. The last objective was to recommend adaptive management strategies to sustain ecosystem natural resources within the context of an active military installation.A goal of CW-5 was to measure the influence of salt marshes on N, P, and C in tidal creek channels. Salt marsh sediment microbial communities and vegetation may affect N, P, and C in creek water overlying the marsh during high tide; these concentration changes would subsequently alter the flux of N, P, and C in the tidal creek channel during low tide. The objective of this research was to measure the rate of concentration change in N, P, and C in a volume of water isolated on the marsh during high tide. This rate of concentration change can be extrapolated across a salt marsh surface to estimate the mass export of N, P, and C back to the tidal creek channel at low tide. Analysis of these data is provided in the CW-5 chapter of the DCERP2 Final Research Report.},
doi = {10.15485/1602910},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {1}
}

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