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Title: Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (1980-1994)

Abstract

The Principal Investigators used a climate-driven regression model to develop spatially resolved estimates of soil-CO2 emissions from the terrestrial land surface for each month from January 1980 to December 1994, to evaluate the effects of interannual variations in climate on global soil-to-atmosphere CO2 fluxes. The mean annual global soil-CO2 flux over this 15-y period was estimated to be 80.4 (range 79.3-81.8) Pg C. Monthly variations in global soil-CO2 emissions followed closely the mean temperature cycle of the Northern Hemisphere. Globally, soil-CO2 emissions reached their minima in February and peaked in July and August. Tropical and subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forests contributed more soil-derived CO2 to the atmosphere than did any other vegetation type (~30% of the total) and exhibited a biannual cycle in their emissions. Soil-CO2 emissions in other biomes exhibited a single annual cycle that paralleled the seasonal temperature cycle. Interannual variability in estimated global soil-CO2 production is substantially less than is variability in net carbon uptake by plants (i.e., net primary productivity). Thus, soils appear to buffer atmospheric CO2 concentrations against far more dramatic seasonal and interannual differences in plant growth. Within seasonally dry biomes (savannas, bushlands, and deserts), interannual variability in soil-CO2 emmissions correlated significantly with interannual differencesmore » in precipitation. At the global scale, however, annual soil-CO2 fluxes correlated with mean annual temperature, with a slope of 3.3 PgCY-1 per degree Celsius. Although the distribution of precipitation influences seasonal and spatial patterns of soil-CO2 emissions, global warming is likely to stimulate CO2 emissions from soils.« less

Authors:
; ;
  1. Iowa State University, Ames, IA (USA)
  2. NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA (United States)
  3. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
Contributors:
Data Manager:

  1. CDIAC, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN
Publication Date:
Other Number(s):
NPD-081
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org.:
Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) (United States); Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BER) (SC-23)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1389506
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/LUE.NDP081

Citation Formats

Raich, James W., Potter, Christopher S., Bhagawat, Dwipen, and Olson, L. M. Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (1980-1994). United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/LUE.NDP081.
Raich, James W., Potter, Christopher S., Bhagawat, Dwipen, & Olson, L. M. Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (1980-1994). United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/LUE.NDP081
Raich, James W., Potter, Christopher S., Bhagawat, Dwipen, and Olson, L. M. 2003. "Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (1980-1994)". United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/LUE.NDP081. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389506. Pub date:Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2003
@article{osti_1389506,
title = {Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (1980-1994)},
author = {Raich, James W. and Potter, Christopher S. and Bhagawat, Dwipen and Olson, L. M.},
abstractNote = {The Principal Investigators used a climate-driven regression model to develop spatially resolved estimates of soil-CO2 emissions from the terrestrial land surface for each month from January 1980 to December 1994, to evaluate the effects of interannual variations in climate on global soil-to-atmosphere CO2 fluxes. The mean annual global soil-CO2 flux over this 15-y period was estimated to be 80.4 (range 79.3-81.8) Pg C. Monthly variations in global soil-CO2 emissions followed closely the mean temperature cycle of the Northern Hemisphere. Globally, soil-CO2 emissions reached their minima in February and peaked in July and August. Tropical and subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forests contributed more soil-derived CO2 to the atmosphere than did any other vegetation type (~30% of the total) and exhibited a biannual cycle in their emissions. Soil-CO2 emissions in other biomes exhibited a single annual cycle that paralleled the seasonal temperature cycle. Interannual variability in estimated global soil-CO2 production is substantially less than is variability in net carbon uptake by plants (i.e., net primary productivity). Thus, soils appear to buffer atmospheric CO2 concentrations against far more dramatic seasonal and interannual differences in plant growth. Within seasonally dry biomes (savannas, bushlands, and deserts), interannual variability in soil-CO2 emmissions correlated significantly with interannual differences in precipitation. At the global scale, however, annual soil-CO2 fluxes correlated with mean annual temperature, with a slope of 3.3 PgCY-1 per degree Celsius. Although the distribution of precipitation influences seasonal and spatial patterns of soil-CO2 emissions, global warming is likely to stimulate CO2 emissions from soils.},
doi = {10.3334/CDIAC/LUE.NDP081},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {8}
}