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Title: Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

Abstract

Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al.,more » 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Other Number(s):
353
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0002748
Research Org.:
USDOE Geothermal Data Repository (United States); University of Nevada
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Renewable Power Office. Geothermal Technologies Program (EE-4G)
Collaborations:
University of Nevada Reno
Subject:
15 Geothermal Energy
Keywords:
geothermal; Slip Tendency; Dilation Tendency; Stress Fields; Quaternary Faults; Great Basin; Walker Lane; Basin and Range; faults; fault systems; hidden geothermal systems; structural controls; EGS; conventional; exploration; shapefile; data; geospatial data
Geolocation:
44.773455872601,-111.048396875|35.2279,-111.048396875|35.2279,-122.287309375|44.773455872601,-122.287309375|44.773455872601,-111.048396875
OSTI Identifier:
1148724
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.15121/1148724
Project Location:

DOE DataExplorer Dataset Location Google Map

Citation Formats

E., James. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.15121/1148724.
E., James. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region. United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.15121/1148724
E., James. 2013. "Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region". United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.15121/1148724. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1148724. Pub date:Mon Sep 30 00:00:00 EDT 2013
@article{osti_1148724,
title = {Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region},
author = {E., James},
abstractNote = {Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin},
doi = {10.15121/1148724},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2013},
month = {9}
}