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Title: AmeriFlux US-WPT Winous Point North Marsh

This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-WPT Winous Point North Marsh. Site Description - The marsh site has been owned by the Winous Point Shooting Club since 1856 and has been managed by wildlife biologists since 1946. The hydrology of the marsh is relatively isolated by the surrounding dikes and drainages and only receives drainage from nearby croplands through three connecting ditches. Since 2001, the marsh has been managed to maintain year-round inundation with the lowest water levels in September. Within the 0–250 m fetch of the tower, the marsh comprises 42.9% of floating-leaved vegetation, 52.7% of emergent vegetation, and 4.4% of dike and upland during the growing season. Dominant emergent plants include narrow-leaved cattail (Typha angustifolia), rose mallow (Hibiscus moscheutos), and bur reed (Sparganium americanum). Common floating-leaved species are water lily (Nymphaea odorata) and American lotus (Nelumbo lutea) with foliage usually covering the water surface from late May to early October.
Authors:
 [1]
  1. University of Toledo / Michigan State University
Publication Date:
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
AmeriFlux; University of Toledo / Michigan State University
Sponsoring Org:
NOAA & NSF
Resource Relation:
Related Information: H Chu, JF Gottgens, J Chen, G Sun, AR Desai, Z Ouyang, C Shao, K Czajkowski, 2015, Climatic variability, hydrologic anomaly, and methane emission can turn productive freshwater marshes into net carbon sources. Global Change Biology 20(3)
Related Identifiers:
OSTI Identifier:
1246155
  1. In 2012 DOE established the AmeriFlux Management Project (AMP) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to support the broad AmeriFlux community and the AmeriFlux sites. AmeriFlux is a network of PI-managed sites measuring ecosystem CO2, water, and energy fluxes in North, Central and South America. It was established to connect research on field sites representing major climate and ecological biomes, including tundra, grasslands, savanna, crops, and conifer, deciduous, and tropical forests. AMP collaborates with AmeriFlux scientists to ensure the quality and availability of the continuous, long-term ecosystem measurements necessary to understand these ecosystems and to build effective models and multisitemore » syntheses. « less
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