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Title: Determining Optimal Equipment Capacities in Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems

Abstract

Evaluation of potential cooling, heating and power (CHP) applications requires an assessment of the operations and economics of a particular system in meeting the electric and thermal demands of a specific end-use facility. A key determinate in whether a candidate system will be economic is the proper selection of equipment capacities. A methodology to determine the optimal capacities for CHP prime movers and absorption chillers using nonlinear optimization algorithms has been coded into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tool that performs the capacity optimization and operations simulation. This paper presents details on the use and results of this publicly available tool.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
OE USDOE - Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution
OSTI Identifier:
993767
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International District Energy Association Annual Conference, Nashville, TN, USA, 20060611, 20060614
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; DUAL-PURPOSE POWER PLANTS; COGENERATION; EQUIPMENT; SIZE; ECONOMICS; ALGORITHMS; COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN

Citation Formats

DeVault, Robert C, and Hudson II, Carl Randy. Determining Optimal Equipment Capacities in Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
DeVault, Robert C, & Hudson II, Carl Randy. Determining Optimal Equipment Capacities in Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems. United States.
DeVault, Robert C, and Hudson II, Carl Randy. Sun . "Determining Optimal Equipment Capacities in Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_993767,
title = {Determining Optimal Equipment Capacities in Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems},
author = {DeVault, Robert C and Hudson II, Carl Randy},
abstractNote = {Evaluation of potential cooling, heating and power (CHP) applications requires an assessment of the operations and economics of a particular system in meeting the electric and thermal demands of a specific end-use facility. A key determinate in whether a candidate system will be economic is the proper selection of equipment capacities. A methodology to determine the optimal capacities for CHP prime movers and absorption chillers using nonlinear optimization algorithms has been coded into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tool that performs the capacity optimization and operations simulation. This paper presents details on the use and results of this publicly available tool.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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