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Title: Mechanism of Interaction Between the General Anesthetic Halothane and a Model Ion Channel Protein, I: Structural Investigations via X-Ray Reflectivity from Langmuir Monolayers

Abstract

We previously reported the synthesis and structural characterization of a model membrane protein comprised of an amphiphilic 4-helix bundle peptide with a hydrophobic domain based on a synthetic ion channel and a hydrophilic domain with designed cavities for binding the general anesthetic halothane. In this work, we synthesized an improved version of this halothane-binding amphiphilic peptide with only a single cavity and an otherwise identical control peptide with no such cavity, and applied x-ray reflectivity to monolayers of these peptides to probe the distribution of halothane along the length of the core of the 4-helix bundle as a function of the concentration of halothane. At the moderate concentrations achieved in this study, approximately three molecules of halothane were found to be localized within a broad symmetric unimodal distribution centered about the designed cavity. At the lowest concentration achieved, of approximately one molecule per bundle, the halothane distribution became narrower and more peaked due to a component of {approx}19Angstroms width centered about the designed cavity. At higher concentrations, approximately six to seven molecules were found to be uniformly distributed along the length of the bundle, corresponding to approximately one molecule per heptad. Monolayers of the control peptide showed only the lattermore » behavior, namely a uniform distribution along the length of the bundle irrespective of the halothane concentration over this range. The results provide insight into the nature of such weak binding when the dissociation constant is in the mM regime, relevant for clinical applications of anesthesia. They also demonstrate the suitability of both the model system and the experimental technique for additional work on the mechanism of general anesthesia, some of it presented in the companion parts II and III under this title.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
980328
Report Number(s):
BNL-93246-2010-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0006-3495; BIOJAU; TRN: US201015%%1713
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 96; Journal Issue: 19
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ANESTHESIA; ANESTHETICS; CAVITIES; DISSOCIATION; DISTRIBUTION; MEMBRANE PROTEINS; PEPTIDES; REFLECTIVITY; SYNTHESIS; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Strzalka, J., Liu, J, Tronin, A, Churbanova, I, Johansson, J, and Blasie, J. Mechanism of Interaction Between the General Anesthetic Halothane and a Model Ion Channel Protein, I: Structural Investigations via X-Ray Reflectivity from Langmuir Monolayers. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bpj.2009.01.053.
Strzalka, J., Liu, J, Tronin, A, Churbanova, I, Johansson, J, & Blasie, J. Mechanism of Interaction Between the General Anesthetic Halothane and a Model Ion Channel Protein, I: Structural Investigations via X-Ray Reflectivity from Langmuir Monolayers. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bpj.2009.01.053.
Strzalka, J., Liu, J, Tronin, A, Churbanova, I, Johansson, J, and Blasie, J. Thu . "Mechanism of Interaction Between the General Anesthetic Halothane and a Model Ion Channel Protein, I: Structural Investigations via X-Ray Reflectivity from Langmuir Monolayers". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bpj.2009.01.053.
@article{osti_980328,
title = {Mechanism of Interaction Between the General Anesthetic Halothane and a Model Ion Channel Protein, I: Structural Investigations via X-Ray Reflectivity from Langmuir Monolayers},
author = {Strzalka, J. and Liu, J and Tronin, A and Churbanova, I and Johansson, J and Blasie, J},
abstractNote = {We previously reported the synthesis and structural characterization of a model membrane protein comprised of an amphiphilic 4-helix bundle peptide with a hydrophobic domain based on a synthetic ion channel and a hydrophilic domain with designed cavities for binding the general anesthetic halothane. In this work, we synthesized an improved version of this halothane-binding amphiphilic peptide with only a single cavity and an otherwise identical control peptide with no such cavity, and applied x-ray reflectivity to monolayers of these peptides to probe the distribution of halothane along the length of the core of the 4-helix bundle as a function of the concentration of halothane. At the moderate concentrations achieved in this study, approximately three molecules of halothane were found to be localized within a broad symmetric unimodal distribution centered about the designed cavity. At the lowest concentration achieved, of approximately one molecule per bundle, the halothane distribution became narrower and more peaked due to a component of {approx}19Angstroms width centered about the designed cavity. At higher concentrations, approximately six to seven molecules were found to be uniformly distributed along the length of the bundle, corresponding to approximately one molecule per heptad. Monolayers of the control peptide showed only the latter behavior, namely a uniform distribution along the length of the bundle irrespective of the halothane concentration over this range. The results provide insight into the nature of such weak binding when the dissociation constant is in the mM regime, relevant for clinical applications of anesthesia. They also demonstrate the suitability of both the model system and the experimental technique for additional work on the mechanism of general anesthesia, some of it presented in the companion parts II and III under this title.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bpj.2009.01.053},
journal = {Biophysical Journal},
number = 19,
volume = 96,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2009},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2009}
}
  • We demonstrate that cyano-phenylalanine (PheCN) can be utilized to probe the binding of the inhalational anesthetic halothane to an anesthetic-binding, model ion channel protein hbAP-PheCN. The Trp to PheCN mutation alters neither the a-helical conformation nor the 4-helix bundle structure. The halothane binding properties of this PheCN mutant hbAP-PheCN, based on fluorescence quenching, are consistent with those of the prototype, hbAP1. The dependence of fluorescence lifetime as a function of halothane concentration implies that the diffusion of halothane in the nonpolar core of the protein bundle is one-dimensional. As a consequence, at low halothane concentrations, the quenching of the fluorescencemore » is dynamic, whereas at high concentrations the quenching becomes static. The 4-helix bundle structure present in aqueous detergent solution and at the air-water interface, is preserved in multilayer films of hbAP-PheCN, enabling vibrational spectroscopy of both the protein and its nitrile label (-CN). The nitrile groups' stretching vibration band shifts to higher frequency in the presence of halothane, and this blue-shift is largely reversible. Due to the complexity of this amphiphilic 4-helix bundle model membrane protein, where four PheCN probes are present adjacent to the designed cavity forming the binding site within each bundle, all contributing to the infrared absorption, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is required to interpret the infrared results. The MD simulations indicate that the blue-shift of -CN stretching vibration induced by halothane arises from an indirect effect, namely an induced change in the electrostatic protein environment averaged over the four probe oscillators, rather than a direct interaction with the oscillators. hbAP-PheCN therefore provides a successful template for extending these investigations of the interactions of halothane with the model membrane protein via vibrational spectroscopy, using cyano-alanine residues to form the anesthetic binding cavity.« less
  • The structure and orientation of adsorbed myoglobin as directed by metal-histidine complexation at the liquid-film interface was studied as a function of time using neutron and X-ray reflectivity (NR and XR, respectively). In this system, adsorption is due to the interaction between iminodiacetate (IDA)-chelated divalent metal ions Ni(II) and Cu(II) and histidine moieties at the outer surface of the protein. Adsorption was examined under conditions of constant area per lipid molecule at an initial pressure of 40 mN/m. Adsorption occurred over a time period of about 15 h, allowing detailed characterization of the layer structure throughout the process. The layermore » thickness and the in-plane averaged segment volume fraction were obtained at roughly 40 min intervals by NR. The binding constant of histidine with Cu(II)-IDA is known to be about four times greater than that of histidine with Ni(II)-IDA. The difference in interaction energy led to significant differences in the structure of the adsorbed layer. For Cu(II)-IDA, the thickness of the adsorbed layer at low protein coverage was {le} 20 {angstrom} and the thickness increased almost linearly with increasing coverage to 42 {angstrom}. For Ni(II)-IDA, the thickness at low coverage was - 38 {angstrom} and increased gradually with coverage to 47 {angstrom}. The in-plane averaged segment volume fraction of the adsorbed layer independently confirmed a thinner layer at low coverage for Cu(II)-IDA. These structural differences at the early stages are discussed in terms of either different preferred orientations for isolated chains in the two cases or more extensive conformational changes upon adsorption in the case of Cu(II)-IDA. Subphase dilution experiments provided additional insight, indicating that the adsorbed layer was not in equilibrium with the bulk solution even at low coverages for both IDA-chelated metal ions. We conclude that the weight of the evidence favors the interpretation based on more extensive conformational changes upon adsorption to Cu(II)-IDA.« less
  • The structure and orientation of adsorbed myoglobin as directed by metal-histidine complexation at the liquid-film interface was studied as a function of time using neutron and X-ray reflectivity (NR and XR, respectively). In this system, adsorption is due to the interaction between iminodiacetate (IDA)-chelated divalent metal ions Ni(II) and Cu(II) and histidine moieties at the outer surface of the protein. Adsorption was examined under conditions of constant area per lipid molecule at an initial pressure of 40 mN/m. Adsorption occurred over a time period of about 15 h, allowing detailed characterization of the layer structure throughout the process. The layermore » thickness and the in-plane averaged segment volume fraction were obtained at roughly 40 min intervals by NR. The binding constant of histidine with Cu(II)-IDA is known to be about four times greater than that of histidine with Ni(II)-IDA. The difference in interaction energy led to significant differences in the structure of the adsorbed layer. For Cu(II)-IDA, the thickness of the adsorbed layer at low protein coverage was {le} 20 {angstrom} and the thickness increased almost linearly with increasing coverage to 42 {angstrom}. For Ni(II)-IDA, the thickness at low coverage was 38 {angstrom} and increased gradually with coverage to 47 {angstrom}. The in-plane averaged segment volume fraction of the adsorbed layer independently confirmed a thinner layer at low coverage for Cu(II)-IDA. These structural differences at the early stages are discussed in terms of either different preferred orientations for isolated chains in the two cases or more extensive conformational changes upon adsorption in the case of Cu(II)-IDA. Subphase dilution experiments provided additional insight, indicating that the adsorbed layer was not in equilibrium with the bulk solution even at low coverages for both IDA-chelated metal ions. We conclude that the weight of the evidence favors the interpretation based on more extensive conformational changes upon adsorption to Cu(II)-IDA.« less