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Title: Bioelectromechanical Imaging by Scanning Probe Microscopy: Galvani's Experiment at the Nanoscale

Abstract

Since the discovery in the late 18th century of electrically induced mechanical response in muscle tissue, coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena has been shown to be a near-universal feature of biological systems. Here, we employ scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to measure the sub-Angstrom mechanical response of a biological system induced by an electric bias applied to a conductive SPM tip. Visualization of the spiral shape and orientation of protein fibrils with 5 nm spatial resolution in a human tooth and chitin molecular bundle orientation in a butterfly wing is demonstrated. In particular, the applicability of SPM-based techniques for the determination of molecular orientation is discussed.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. ORNL
  2. North Carolina State University
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
976004
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Ultramicroscopy; Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 4-5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; CHITIN; MICROSCOPY; MUSCLES; ORIENTATION; PROBES; PROTEINS; SHAPE; SPATIAL RESOLUTION

Citation Formats

Kalinin, Sergei V, Rodriguez, Brian J, Shin, Junsoo, Jesse, Stephen, Grichko, V., Thundat, Thomas George, Baddorf, Arthur P, and Gruverman, A.. Bioelectromechanical Imaging by Scanning Probe Microscopy: Galvani's Experiment at the Nanoscale. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2005.10.005.
Kalinin, Sergei V, Rodriguez, Brian J, Shin, Junsoo, Jesse, Stephen, Grichko, V., Thundat, Thomas George, Baddorf, Arthur P, & Gruverman, A.. Bioelectromechanical Imaging by Scanning Probe Microscopy: Galvani's Experiment at the Nanoscale. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2005.10.005.
Kalinin, Sergei V, Rodriguez, Brian J, Shin, Junsoo, Jesse, Stephen, Grichko, V., Thundat, Thomas George, Baddorf, Arthur P, and Gruverman, A.. Sun . "Bioelectromechanical Imaging by Scanning Probe Microscopy: Galvani's Experiment at the Nanoscale". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2005.10.005.
@article{osti_976004,
title = {Bioelectromechanical Imaging by Scanning Probe Microscopy: Galvani's Experiment at the Nanoscale},
author = {Kalinin, Sergei V and Rodriguez, Brian J and Shin, Junsoo and Jesse, Stephen and Grichko, V. and Thundat, Thomas George and Baddorf, Arthur P and Gruverman, A.},
abstractNote = {Since the discovery in the late 18th century of electrically induced mechanical response in muscle tissue, coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena has been shown to be a near-universal feature of biological systems. Here, we employ scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to measure the sub-Angstrom mechanical response of a biological system induced by an electric bias applied to a conductive SPM tip. Visualization of the spiral shape and orientation of protein fibrils with 5 nm spatial resolution in a human tooth and chitin molecular bundle orientation in a butterfly wing is demonstrated. In particular, the applicability of SPM-based techniques for the determination of molecular orientation is discussed.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2005.10.005},
journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
number = 4-5,
volume = 106,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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