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Title: THERMAL STRESS CALCULATIONS FOR HEATPIPE-COOLED REACTOR POWER SYSTEMS.

Abstract

A heatpipe-cooled fast reactor concept has been under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the past several years, to be used as a power source for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) or as a planetary surface power system. The reactor core consists of an array of modules that are held together by a core lateral restraint system. Each module comprises a single heatpipe surrounded by 3-6 clad fuel pins. As part of the design development and performance assessment activities for these reactors, specialized methods and models have been developed to perform thermal and stress analyses of the core modules. The methods have been automated so that trade studies can be readily performed, looking at design options such as module size, heatpipe and clad thickness, use of sleeves to contain the fuel, material type, etc. This paper describes the methods and models that have been developed, and presents thermal and stress analysis results for a Mars surface power system and a NEP power source.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. (Richard J.)
  2. (Ray M.)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
975871
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-01-6386
TRN: US1006807
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Submitted to: Space Technology and Applications International Forum, February 3-7, 2002, Albuquerque, NM
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; DESIGN; FAST REACTORS; FUEL PINS; LANL; PERFORMANCE; POWER SYSTEMS; PROPULSION; REACTOR CORES; RESTRAINTS; SLEEVES; STRESS ANALYSIS; THICKNESS; PROPULSION REACTORS; PROPULSION SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Kapernick, R. J., and Guffee, R. M. THERMAL STRESS CALCULATIONS FOR HEATPIPE-COOLED REACTOR POWER SYSTEMS.. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
Kapernick, R. J., & Guffee, R. M. THERMAL STRESS CALCULATIONS FOR HEATPIPE-COOLED REACTOR POWER SYSTEMS.. United States.
Kapernick, R. J., and Guffee, R. M. Mon . "THERMAL STRESS CALCULATIONS FOR HEATPIPE-COOLED REACTOR POWER SYSTEMS.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/975871.
@article{osti_975871,
title = {THERMAL STRESS CALCULATIONS FOR HEATPIPE-COOLED REACTOR POWER SYSTEMS.},
author = {Kapernick, R. J. and Guffee, R. M.},
abstractNote = {A heatpipe-cooled fast reactor concept has been under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the past several years, to be used as a power source for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) or as a planetary surface power system. The reactor core consists of an array of modules that are held together by a core lateral restraint system. Each module comprises a single heatpipe surrounded by 3-6 clad fuel pins. As part of the design development and performance assessment activities for these reactors, specialized methods and models have been developed to perform thermal and stress analyses of the core modules. The methods have been automated so that trade studies can be readily performed, looking at design options such as module size, heatpipe and clad thickness, use of sleeves to contain the fuel, material type, etc. This paper describes the methods and models that have been developed, and presents thermal and stress analysis results for a Mars surface power system and a NEP power source.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2001},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2001}
}

Conference:
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