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Title: Proteins : paradigms of complexity /

Abstract

Proteins are the working machines of living systems. Directed by the DNA, of the order of a few hundred building blocks, selected from twenty different amino acids, are covalently linked into a linear polypeptide chain. In the proper environment, the chain folds into the working protein, often a globule of linear dimensions of a few nanometers. The biologist considers proteins units from which living systems are built. Many physical scientists look at them as systems in which the laws of complexity can be studied better than anywhere else. Some of the results of such studies will be sketched.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
975750
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-01-5235
TRN: US201018%%837
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: "Submitted to: Proceedings National Academy Science, USA, Sackler Colloquium of the National Academy Science, USA "Self-Organized Complex in the Physical, Biological, and Social Science", March 23-24, 2001, Irvine, CA"
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; AMINO ACIDS; CHAINS; DIMENSIONS; DNA; POLYPEPTIDES; PROTEINS

Citation Formats

Frauenfelder, Hans,. Proteins : paradigms of complexity /. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
Frauenfelder, Hans,. Proteins : paradigms of complexity /. United States.
Frauenfelder, Hans,. 2001. "Proteins : paradigms of complexity /". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/975750.
@article{osti_975750,
title = {Proteins : paradigms of complexity /},
author = {Frauenfelder, Hans,},
abstractNote = {Proteins are the working machines of living systems. Directed by the DNA, of the order of a few hundred building blocks, selected from twenty different amino acids, are covalently linked into a linear polypeptide chain. In the proper environment, the chain folds into the working protein, often a globule of linear dimensions of a few nanometers. The biologist considers proteins units from which living systems are built. Many physical scientists look at them as systems in which the laws of complexity can be studied better than anywhere else. Some of the results of such studies will be sketched.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2001,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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