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Title: Beyond the Nuclear Shell Model

Abstract

Nuclei, the fuel that burns in stars, make up 99.9% of all baryonic matter in the universe. The complex nature of the nuclear forces among protons and neutrons generates a broad range and diversity of nuclear phenomena. Developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions represents one of the great intellectual opportunities for physics. As nuclear physicists have seen during the past 10 years, success will require theoretical and experimental investigations of isotopes with unusual neutron-to-proton ratios. Such nuclei, which are typically not found on Earth, are called exotic or rare.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
971566
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics Today; Journal Volume: 60; Journal Issue: 11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; NEUTRONS; NUCLEAR FORCES; NUCLEI; PHYSICS; PROTONS; SHELL MODELS; STARS; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Dean, David Jarvis. Beyond the Nuclear Shell Model. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2812123.
Dean, David Jarvis. Beyond the Nuclear Shell Model. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2812123.
Dean, David Jarvis. Mon . "Beyond the Nuclear Shell Model". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2812123.
@article{osti_971566,
title = {Beyond the Nuclear Shell Model},
author = {Dean, David Jarvis},
abstractNote = {Nuclei, the fuel that burns in stars, make up 99.9% of all baryonic matter in the universe. The complex nature of the nuclear forces among protons and neutrons generates a broad range and diversity of nuclear phenomena. Developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions represents one of the great intellectual opportunities for physics. As nuclear physicists have seen during the past 10 years, success will require theoretical and experimental investigations of isotopes with unusual neutron-to-proton ratios. Such nuclei, which are typically not found on Earth, are called exotic or rare.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2812123},
journal = {Physics Today},
number = 11,
volume = 60,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}