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Title: A 2D range Hausdorff approach for 3D face recognition.

Abstract

This paper presents a 3D facial recognition algorithm based on the Hausdorff distance metric. The standard 3D formulation of the Hausdorff matching algorithm has been modified to operate on a 2D range image, enabling a reduction in computation from O(N2) to O(N) without large storage requirements. The Hausdorff distance is known for its robustness to data outliers and inconsistent data between two data sets, making it a suitable choice for dealing with the inherent problems in many 3D datasets due to sensor noise and object self-occlusion. For optimal performance, the algorithm assumes a good initial alignment between probe and template datasets. However, to minimize the error between two faces, the alignment can be iteratively refined. Results from the algorithm are presented using 3D face images from the Face Recognition Grand Challenge database version 1.0.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
970204
Report Number(s):
SAND2005-2316C
TRN: US201003%%431
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Face Recognition Grand Challenge Workshop at CVPR 2005 held June 20-26, 2005 in San Diego, CA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ALGORITHMS; ALIGNMENT; PERFORMANCE; PROBES; STORAGE; HAUSDORFF SPACE

Citation Formats

Koch, Mark William, Russ, Trina Denise, and Little, Charles Quentin. A 2D range Hausdorff approach for 3D face recognition.. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Koch, Mark William, Russ, Trina Denise, & Little, Charles Quentin. A 2D range Hausdorff approach for 3D face recognition.. United States.
Koch, Mark William, Russ, Trina Denise, and Little, Charles Quentin. 2005. "A 2D range Hausdorff approach for 3D face recognition.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_970204,
title = {A 2D range Hausdorff approach for 3D face recognition.},
author = {Koch, Mark William and Russ, Trina Denise and Little, Charles Quentin},
abstractNote = {This paper presents a 3D facial recognition algorithm based on the Hausdorff distance metric. The standard 3D formulation of the Hausdorff matching algorithm has been modified to operate on a 2D range image, enabling a reduction in computation from O(N2) to O(N) without large storage requirements. The Hausdorff distance is known for its robustness to data outliers and inconsistent data between two data sets, making it a suitable choice for dealing with the inherent problems in many 3D datasets due to sensor noise and object self-occlusion. For optimal performance, the algorithm assumes a good initial alignment between probe and template datasets. However, to minimize the error between two faces, the alignment can be iteratively refined. Results from the algorithm are presented using 3D face images from the Face Recognition Grand Challenge database version 1.0.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2005,
month = 4
}

Conference:
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  • This paper presents a 3D facial recognition algorithm based on the Hausdorff distance metric. The standard 3D formulation of the Hausdorff matching algorithm has been modified to operate on a 2D range image, enabling a reduction in computation from O(N2) to O(N) without large storage requirements. The Hausdorff distance is known for its robustness to data outliers and inconsistent data between two data sets, making it a suitable choice for dealing with the inherent problems in many 3D datasets due to sensor noise and object self-occlusion. For optimal performance, the algorithm assumes a good initial alignment between probe and templatemore » datasets. However, to minimize the error between two faces, the alignment can be iteratively refined. Results from the algorithm are presented using 3D face images from the Face Recognition Grand Challenge database version 1.0.« less
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  • Object recognition algorithms are fundamental tools in automatic matching of geometric shapes within a background scene. Many approaches have been proposed in the past to solve the object recognition problem. Two of the key aspects that distinguish them in terms of their practical usability are: (i) the type of input model description and (ii) the comparison criteria used. In this paper we introduce a novel scheme for 3D object recognition based on line segment representation of the input shapes and comparison using the Hausdor distance. This choice of model representation provides the flexibility to apply the scheme in different applicationmore » areas. We define several variants of the Hausdor distance to compare the models within the framework of well defined metric spaces. We present a matching algorithm that efficiently finds a pattern in a 3D scene. The algorithm approximates a minimization procedure of the Hausdor distance. The output error due to the approximation is guaranteed to be within a known constant bound. Practical results are presented for two classes of objects: (i) polyhedral shapes extracted from segmented range images and (ii) secondary structures of large molecules. In both cases the use of our approximate algorithm allows to match correctly the pattern in the background while achieving the efficiency necessary for practical use of the scheme. In particular the performance is improved substantially with minor degradation of the quality of the matching.« less
  • The Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recently developed the real-time, face recognition technology KEN. KEN uses novel imaging devices such as silicon retinas developed at Caltech or off-the-shelf CCD cameras to acquire images of a face and to compare them to a database of known faces in a robust fashion. The KEN-Online project makes that recognition technology accessible through the World Wide Web (WWW), an internet service that has recently seen explosive growth. A WWW client can submit face images, add them to the database of known faces and submit other pictures that themore » system tries to recognize. KEN-Online serves to evaluate the recognition technology and grow a large face database. KEN-Online includes the use of public domain tools such as mSQL for its name-database and perl scripts to assist the uploading of images.« less
  • A face detection system that automatically locates faces in gray-level images is described. Also described is a system which matches a given face image with faces in a database. Face detection in an Image is performed by template matching using templates derived from a selected set of normalized faces. Instead of using original gray level images, vertical gradient images were calculated and used to make the system more robust against variations in lighting conditions and skin color. Faces of different sizes are detected by processing the image at several scales. Further, a coarse-to-fine strategy is used to speed up themore » processing, and a combination of whole face and face component templates are used to ensure low false detection rates. The input to the face recognition system is a normalized vertical gradient image of a face, which is compared against a database using a set of pretrained feedforward neural networks with a winner-take-all fuser. The training is performed by using an adaptation of the backpropagation algorithm. This system has been developed and tested using images from the FERET database and a set of images obtained from Rowley, et al and Sung and Poggio.« less