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Title: Radioactive sample effects on EDXRF spectra

Abstract

Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a rapid, straightforward method to determine sample elemental composition. A spectrum can be collected in a few minutes or less, and elemental content can be determined easily if there is adequate energy resolution. Radioactive alpha emitters, however, emit X-rays during the alpha decay process that complicate spectral interpretation. This is particularly noticeable when using a portable instrument where the detector is located in close proximity to the instrument analysis window held against the sample. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from specimens containing plutonium-239 (a moderate alpha emitter) and americium-241 (a heavy alpha emitter). These specimens were then analyzed with a wavelength dispersive XRF (WDXRF) instrument to demonstrate the differences to which sample radiation-induced X-ray emission affects the detectors on these two types of XRF instruments.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
960609
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-08-05480; LA-UR-08-5480
TRN: US201006%%1249
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37; ALPHA DECAY; AMERICIUM 241; EMISSION; ENERGY RESOLUTION; FLUORESCENCE; PLUTONIUM 239; SPECTRA; WAVELENGTHS; X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS

Citation Formats

Worley, Christopher G. Radioactive sample effects on EDXRF spectra. United States: N. p., 2008. Web.
Worley, Christopher G. Radioactive sample effects on EDXRF spectra. United States.
Worley, Christopher G. 2008. "Radioactive sample effects on EDXRF spectra". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/960609.
@article{osti_960609,
title = {Radioactive sample effects on EDXRF spectra},
author = {Worley, Christopher G},
abstractNote = {Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a rapid, straightforward method to determine sample elemental composition. A spectrum can be collected in a few minutes or less, and elemental content can be determined easily if there is adequate energy resolution. Radioactive alpha emitters, however, emit X-rays during the alpha decay process that complicate spectral interpretation. This is particularly noticeable when using a portable instrument where the detector is located in close proximity to the instrument analysis window held against the sample. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from specimens containing plutonium-239 (a moderate alpha emitter) and americium-241 (a heavy alpha emitter). These specimens were then analyzed with a wavelength dispersive XRF (WDXRF) instrument to demonstrate the differences to which sample radiation-induced X-ray emission affects the detectors on these two types of XRF instruments.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 1
}
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