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Title: Advanced exterior sensor project : final report, September 2004.

Abstract

This report (1) summarizes the overall design of the Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES) system to include detailed descriptions of system components, (2) describes the work accomplished throughout FY04 to evaluate the current health of the original prototype and to return it to operation, (3) describes the status of the AES and the AES project as of September 2004, and (4) details activities planned to complete modernization of the system to include development and testing of the second-generation AES prototype.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
958387
Report Number(s):
SAND2004-6547
TRN: US201001%%7
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; SENSORS; DESIGN; TESTING; ENTRY CONTROL SYSTEMS; PHYSICAL PROTECTION DEVICES; Sensors.; Electronic security systems.; Detection.

Citation Formats

Ashby, M. Rodema. Advanced exterior sensor project : final report, September 2004.. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2172/958387.
Ashby, M. Rodema. Advanced exterior sensor project : final report, September 2004.. United States. doi:10.2172/958387.
Ashby, M. Rodema. 2004. "Advanced exterior sensor project : final report, September 2004.". United States. doi:10.2172/958387. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/958387.
@article{osti_958387,
title = {Advanced exterior sensor project : final report, September 2004.},
author = {Ashby, M. Rodema},
abstractNote = {This report (1) summarizes the overall design of the Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES) system to include detailed descriptions of system components, (2) describes the work accomplished throughout FY04 to evaluate the current health of the original prototype and to return it to operation, (3) describes the status of the AES and the AES project as of September 2004, and (4) details activities planned to complete modernization of the system to include development and testing of the second-generation AES prototype.},
doi = {10.2172/958387},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2004,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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