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Title: EPA perspective on radionuclide aerosol sampling

Abstract

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is concerned with radionuclide aerosol sampling primarily at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in order to insure compliance with national air emission standards, known as NESHAPs. Sampling procedures are specified in {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides other than Radon from Department of Energy Sites{close_quotes} (Subpart H). Subpart H also allows alternate procedures to be used if they meet certain requirements. This paper discusses some of the mission differences between EPA and Doe and how these differences are reflected in decisions that are made. It then describes how the EPA develops standards, considers alternate sampling procedures, and lists suggestions to speed up the review and acceptance process for alternate procedures. The paper concludes with a discussion of the process for delegation of Radionuclide NESHAPs responsibilities to the States, and responsibilities that could be retained by EPA.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Guidance; Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research; International Society of Nuclear Air Treatment Technologies, Inc., Batavia, OH (United States); Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Air Cleaning Lab.
OSTI Identifier:
95653
Report Number(s):
NUREG/CP-0141; CONF-940738-
ON: TI95007828; TRN: 95:018816
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 23. DOE/NRC nuclear air cleaning and treatment conference, Buffalo, NY (United States), 25-28 Jul 1994; Other Information: PBD: Feb 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the 23rd DOE/NRC nuclear air cleaning conference; First, M.W. [ed.] [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Air Cleaning Lab.]; PB: 820 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 NUCLEAR REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; RADIOACTIVE AEROSOLS; SAMPLING; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; US EPA; REGULATIONS; COMPLIANCE; US DOE

Citation Formats

Karhnak, J.M. EPA perspective on radionuclide aerosol sampling. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Karhnak, J.M. EPA perspective on radionuclide aerosol sampling. United States.
Karhnak, J.M. 1995. "EPA perspective on radionuclide aerosol sampling". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/95653.
@article{osti_95653,
title = {EPA perspective on radionuclide aerosol sampling},
author = {Karhnak, J.M.},
abstractNote = {The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is concerned with radionuclide aerosol sampling primarily at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in order to insure compliance with national air emission standards, known as NESHAPs. Sampling procedures are specified in {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides other than Radon from Department of Energy Sites{close_quotes} (Subpart H). Subpart H also allows alternate procedures to be used if they meet certain requirements. This paper discusses some of the mission differences between EPA and Doe and how these differences are reflected in decisions that are made. It then describes how the EPA develops standards, considers alternate sampling procedures, and lists suggestions to speed up the review and acceptance process for alternate procedures. The paper concludes with a discussion of the process for delegation of Radionuclide NESHAPs responsibilities to the States, and responsibilities that could be retained by EPA.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 2
}

Conference:
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