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Title: A modified Hopkinson pressure bar experiment to evaluate a damped piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer.

Abstract

We conducted a series of modified Hopkinson pressure bar (HPB) experiments to evaluate a new, damped, high-shock accelerometer that has recently been developed by PCB Piezotronics Inc. Pulse shapers were used to create a long duration, non-dispersive stress pulse in an aluminum bar that interacted with a tungsten disk at the end of the incident bar. We measured stress at the aluminum bar-disk interface with a quartz gage and measured acceleration at the free-end of the disk with an Endevco brand 7270A and the new PCB 3991 accelerometers. The rise-time of the incident stress pulse in the aluminum bar was long enough and the disk length short enough so that the response of the disk can be approximated closely as rigid-body motion; an experimentally verified analytical model has been shown previously to support this assumption. Since the cross-sectional area and mass of the disk were known, we calculated acceleration of the rigid-disk from the quartz-gage force measurement and Newton's Second Law of Motion. Comparisons of accelerations calculated from the quartz-gage data and measured acceleration data show excellent agreement for acceleration pulses with the PCB accelerometer for peak amplitudes between 4,000 and 40,000 Gs , rise times as short as 40more » microsec, and pulse durations between 150 and 320 microsec.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
950651
Report Number(s):
SAND2009-1435C
TRN: US200910%%291
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 2009 SEM Annual Conference & Exposition on Experimental and Applied Mechanics held June 1-4, 2009 in Albuquerque, NM.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; ACCELERATION; ACCELEROMETERS; ALUMINIUM; AMPLITUDES; PULSE RISE TIME; PULSE SHAPERS; QUARTZ; TUNGSTEN

Citation Formats

Frew, Danny Joe, and Duong, Henry. A modified Hopkinson pressure bar experiment to evaluate a damped piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer.. United States: N. p., 2009. Web.
Frew, Danny Joe, & Duong, Henry. A modified Hopkinson pressure bar experiment to evaluate a damped piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer.. United States.
Frew, Danny Joe, and Duong, Henry. 2009. "A modified Hopkinson pressure bar experiment to evaluate a damped piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_950651,
title = {A modified Hopkinson pressure bar experiment to evaluate a damped piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer.},
author = {Frew, Danny Joe and Duong, Henry},
abstractNote = {We conducted a series of modified Hopkinson pressure bar (HPB) experiments to evaluate a new, damped, high-shock accelerometer that has recently been developed by PCB Piezotronics Inc. Pulse shapers were used to create a long duration, non-dispersive stress pulse in an aluminum bar that interacted with a tungsten disk at the end of the incident bar. We measured stress at the aluminum bar-disk interface with a quartz gage and measured acceleration at the free-end of the disk with an Endevco brand 7270A and the new PCB 3991 accelerometers. The rise-time of the incident stress pulse in the aluminum bar was long enough and the disk length short enough so that the response of the disk can be approximated closely as rigid-body motion; an experimentally verified analytical model has been shown previously to support this assumption. Since the cross-sectional area and mass of the disk were known, we calculated acceleration of the rigid-disk from the quartz-gage force measurement and Newton's Second Law of Motion. Comparisons of accelerations calculated from the quartz-gage data and measured acceleration data show excellent agreement for acceleration pulses with the PCB accelerometer for peak amplitudes between 4,000 and 40,000 Gs , rise times as short as 40 microsec, and pulse durations between 150 and 320 microsec.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month = 3
}

Conference:
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  • The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend our understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. In this paper, the beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration with a laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement is described. The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer for frequencies of dc-50 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 70,000 g as determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinsonmore » bar are presented. Preliminary results of characterizations of the accelerometers subjected to cross-axis shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration are presented.« less
  • Development of both uniaxial and triaxial shock isolation techniques for pyroshock and impact tests has continued this year. The uniaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable characteristics for a temperature range of {minus}50{degrees}F to +186{degrees}F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. The triaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable results for a temperature range of {minus}50{degrees}F to 70{degrees}F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. 5 refs., 7 figs.
  • A mechanical isolator has been developed for a piezoresistive accelerometer. The purpose of the isolator is to mitigate high frequency shocks before they reach the accelerometer because the high frequency shocks may cause the accelerometer to resonate. Since the accelerometer is undamped, it often breaks when it resonates. The mechanical isolator was developed in response to impact test requirements for a variety of structures at Sandia National Laboratories. An Extended Technical Assistance Program with the accelerometer manufacturer has resulted in a commercial isolator that will be available to the general public. This mechanical isolator has ten times the bandwidth ofmore » any other commercial isolator and has acceptable frequency domain performance from DC to 10 kHz ({plus_minus} 10%) over a temperature range of -65{degrees}F to +185{degrees}F as demonstrated in this paper.« less
  • Sandia conducts impact testing for a variety of structures. In this slapdown test, one end of the cask impacts the hard concrete target, then the structure rotates so that the other end of the cask impacts the target. During an impact test, metal to metal contact may occur within the structure and produce high frequency, high amplitude shock inputs. The high frequency portion of this transient vibration has been observed to excite the accelerometer resonance even though this resonance exceeds 350 kHz. The amplitude of the resonating accelerometer response can be so large that the data are clipped and aremore » rendered useless. If the data are not clipped, a digital filter must be applied to eliminate the undesired accelerometer resonant response. If possible, it is more desirable to prevent excitation of the accelerometer resonance, This may be accomplished by mechanically isolating the accelerometer from the high frequency excitation without degrading the transducer response in the bandwidth of interest which is usually 10 kHz or less. To achieve this desirable isolation, two mounting configurations were designed and characterized. The objective of this paper is to describe the evaluation technique and to discuss the shock isolation properties of each mounting configuration. One configuration was actually used in a field test of bomb impacting a target. 4 figs.« less
  • The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend our undemanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. Two different Hopkinson bar materials are being used: Titanium and beryllium The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer for frequencies of dc-10 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 150,000 g as determined from measurements with a titanium Hopkinson bar are presented. The beryllium Hopkinson bar configurationmore » is described. Preliminary in-axis characteristics of the piezoresistive accelerometer at a nominal shock level of 50,000 g for a frequency range of DC-30 kHz determined from the beryllium bar are presented.« less