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Title: Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria

Abstract

We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloidsmore » that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
9492
Report Number(s):
SAND99-2006J
TRN: US0103137
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Materials Research Symposium
Additional Journal Information:
Other Information: Submitted to Materials Research Symposium; PBD: 28 Jul 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BACTERIA; BRINES; URANYL CARBONATES; URANYL NITRATES; WIPP; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; COLLOIDS

Citation Formats

Gillow, J.B., Francis, A.J., Dodge, C.J., Harris, R., Beveridge, T.J., Brady, P.V., and Papenguth, H.W. Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1557/PROC-556-1133.
Gillow, J.B., Francis, A.J., Dodge, C.J., Harris, R., Beveridge, T.J., Brady, P.V., & Papenguth, H.W. Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria. United States. doi:10.1557/PROC-556-1133.
Gillow, J.B., Francis, A.J., Dodge, C.J., Harris, R., Beveridge, T.J., Brady, P.V., and Papenguth, H.W. Wed . "Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria". United States. doi:10.1557/PROC-556-1133. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/9492.
@article{osti_9492,
title = {Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria},
author = {Gillow, J.B. and Francis, A.J. and Dodge, C.J. and Harris, R. and Beveridge, T.J. and Brady, P.V. and Papenguth, H.W.},
abstractNote = {We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.},
doi = {10.1557/PROC-556-1133},
journal = {Materials Research Symposium},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {7}
}