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Title: Exercises Abroad: How Differing National Experiences are Reflected in Emergency Response Planning and Exercises

Abstract

Recently a member of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Consequence Management Response Team took part in outreaches and an exercise in different foreign countries. In Brazil and South Korea, the outreaches revolved around a nuclear power plant exercise. In Canada, participation was limited to a table top Consequence Management exercise. This talk will briefly discuss each event and resulting pertinent observations. In each case, it became evident that governments respond to disasters very differently, and that these differences are not only culturally based, but also influenced by each government’s respective experience in dealing with natural disasters.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Security Technologies, LLC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NA)
OSTI Identifier:
946431
Report Number(s):
DOE/NV/25946-110
TRN: US0900955
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC52-06NA25946
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Annual National Radiological Emergency Preparedness Conference; Newport Beach, CA; April 30-May 3, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; BRAZIL; CANADA; MANAGEMENT; NATURAL DISASTERS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; PLANNING; REPUBLIC OF KOREA; EMERGENCY PLANS; SIMULATION; emergency response planning, international

Citation Formats

Craig Marianno. Exercises Abroad: How Differing National Experiences are Reflected in Emergency Response Planning and Exercises. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Craig Marianno. Exercises Abroad: How Differing National Experiences are Reflected in Emergency Response Planning and Exercises. United States.
Craig Marianno. Mon . "Exercises Abroad: How Differing National Experiences are Reflected in Emergency Response Planning and Exercises". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/946431.
@article{osti_946431,
title = {Exercises Abroad: How Differing National Experiences are Reflected in Emergency Response Planning and Exercises},
author = {Craig Marianno},
abstractNote = {Recently a member of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Consequence Management Response Team took part in outreaches and an exercise in different foreign countries. In Brazil and South Korea, the outreaches revolved around a nuclear power plant exercise. In Canada, participation was limited to a table top Consequence Management exercise. This talk will briefly discuss each event and resulting pertinent observations. In each case, it became evident that governments respond to disasters very differently, and that these differences are not only culturally based, but also influenced by each government’s respective experience in dealing with natural disasters.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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