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Title: Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007

Abstract

Research in earth and atmospheric sciences has become increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and other environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than fossil hydrocarbons, the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases, and a detailed understanding of the climatic consequences of our energy choices are all critical to meeting energy needs while ensuring environmental safety. The cleanup of underground contamination and the preservation and management of water supplies continue to provide challenges, as they will for generations into the future. To address the critical energy and environmental issues requires continuing advances in our knowledge of Earth systems and our ability to translate that knowledge into new technologies. The fundamental Earth science research common to energy and environmental issues largely involves the physics, chemistry, and biology of fluids in and on the Earth. To manage Earth fluids requires the ability to understand their properties and behavior at the most fundamental molecular level, as well as prediction, characterization, imaging, and manipulation of those fluids and their behavior in real Earth reservoirs. The broad range of disciplinary expertise, the huge range of spatial and time scales, and themore » need to integrate theoretical, computational, laboratory and field research, represent both the challenge and the excitement of Earth science research. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is committed to addressing the key scientific and technical challenges that are needed to secure our energy future in an environmentally responsibly way. Our staff of over 200 scientists, UC Berkeley faculty, support staff and guests perform world-acclaimed fundamental research in hydrogeology and reservoir engineering, geophysics and geomechanics, geochemistry, microbial ecology, climate systems, and environmental engineering. Building on this scientific foundation, we also perform applied earth science research and technology development to support DOE in a number of its program areas. We currently organize our efforts in the following Division Programs: Fundamental and Exploratory Research--fundamental research in geochemistry, geophysics, and hydrology to provide a basis for new and improved energy and environmental technologies; Climate and Carbon Sciences--carbon cycling in the terrestrial biosphere and oceans, and global and regional climate modeling, are the cornerstones of a major developing divisional research thrust related to understanding and mitigating the effects of increased greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere; Energy Resources--collaborative projects with industry to develop or improve technologies for the exploration and production of oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs, and for the development of bioenergy; Environmental Remediation and Water Resources--innovative technologies for locating, containing, and remediating metals, radionuclides, chlorinated solvents, and energy-related contaminants in soils and groundwaters; Geologic Carbon Sequestration--development and testing of methods for introducing carbon dioxide to subsurface geologic reservoirs, and predicting and monitoring its subsequent migration; and Nuclear Waste and Energy--theoretical, experimental, and simulation studies of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These programs draw from each of ESD's disciplinary departments: Climate Science, Ecology, Geochemistry, Geophysics, and Hydrogeology. Short descriptions of these departments are provided as introductory material. In this document, we present summaries of selected current research projects. While it is not a complete accounting, the projects described here are representative of the nature and breadth of the ESD research effort. We are proud of our scientific accomplishments and we hope that you will find this material useful and exciting. A list of publications for the period from January 2006 to June 2007, along with a listing of our personnel, are also appended. Any comments on our research are appreciated and can be sent to me personally.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Earth Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
935758
Report Number(s):
LBNL-771E
TRN: US0805445
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; 58; BIOLOGY; BIOSPHERE; CARBON; CARBON DIOXIDE; CHEMISTRY; CLIMATIC CHANGE; CONTAMINATION; ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING; GEOCHEMISTRY; GEOPHYSICS; GREENHOUSE GASES; HYDROCARBONS; HYDROLOGY; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; RADIOISOTOPES; RESERVOIR ENGINEERING; YUCCA MOUNTAIN

Citation Formats

DePaolo, Donald, and DePaolo, Donald. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.2172/935758.
DePaolo, Donald, & DePaolo, Donald. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007. United States. doi:10.2172/935758.
DePaolo, Donald, and DePaolo, Donald. Mon . "Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007". United States. doi:10.2172/935758. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/935758.
@article{osti_935758,
title = {Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007},
author = {DePaolo, Donald and DePaolo, Donald},
abstractNote = {Research in earth and atmospheric sciences has become increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and other environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than fossil hydrocarbons, the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases, and a detailed understanding of the climatic consequences of our energy choices are all critical to meeting energy needs while ensuring environmental safety. The cleanup of underground contamination and the preservation and management of water supplies continue to provide challenges, as they will for generations into the future. To address the critical energy and environmental issues requires continuing advances in our knowledge of Earth systems and our ability to translate that knowledge into new technologies. The fundamental Earth science research common to energy and environmental issues largely involves the physics, chemistry, and biology of fluids in and on the Earth. To manage Earth fluids requires the ability to understand their properties and behavior at the most fundamental molecular level, as well as prediction, characterization, imaging, and manipulation of those fluids and their behavior in real Earth reservoirs. The broad range of disciplinary expertise, the huge range of spatial and time scales, and the need to integrate theoretical, computational, laboratory and field research, represent both the challenge and the excitement of Earth science research. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is committed to addressing the key scientific and technical challenges that are needed to secure our energy future in an environmentally responsibly way. Our staff of over 200 scientists, UC Berkeley faculty, support staff and guests perform world-acclaimed fundamental research in hydrogeology and reservoir engineering, geophysics and geomechanics, geochemistry, microbial ecology, climate systems, and environmental engineering. Building on this scientific foundation, we also perform applied earth science research and technology development to support DOE in a number of its program areas. We currently organize our efforts in the following Division Programs: Fundamental and Exploratory Research--fundamental research in geochemistry, geophysics, and hydrology to provide a basis for new and improved energy and environmental technologies; Climate and Carbon Sciences--carbon cycling in the terrestrial biosphere and oceans, and global and regional climate modeling, are the cornerstones of a major developing divisional research thrust related to understanding and mitigating the effects of increased greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere; Energy Resources--collaborative projects with industry to develop or improve technologies for the exploration and production of oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs, and for the development of bioenergy; Environmental Remediation and Water Resources--innovative technologies for locating, containing, and remediating metals, radionuclides, chlorinated solvents, and energy-related contaminants in soils and groundwaters; Geologic Carbon Sequestration--development and testing of methods for introducing carbon dioxide to subsurface geologic reservoirs, and predicting and monitoring its subsequent migration; and Nuclear Waste and Energy--theoretical, experimental, and simulation studies of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These programs draw from each of ESD's disciplinary departments: Climate Science, Ecology, Geochemistry, Geophysics, and Hydrogeology. Short descriptions of these departments are provided as introductory material. In this document, we present summaries of selected current research projects. While it is not a complete accounting, the projects described here are representative of the nature and breadth of the ESD research effort. We are proud of our scientific accomplishments and we hope that you will find this material useful and exciting. A list of publications for the period from January 2006 to June 2007, along with a listing of our personnel, are also appended. Any comments on our research are appreciated and can be sent to me personally.},
doi = {10.2172/935758},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 21 00:00:00 EDT 2008},
month = {Mon Jul 21 00:00:00 EDT 2008}
}

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