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Title: Low dissolved organic carbon input from fresh litter to deep mineral soils

Abstract

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from recent litter in the forest floor has been suggested to be an important source of C to the mineral soil of forest ecosystems. In order to determine the rate at which this flux of C occurs we have taken advantage of a local release of 14C at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Reservation, USA (latitude N 35 58'; longitude W 84 16'). Eight replicate 7x7 m plots were estab lished at four field sites on the reservation in an upland oak forest setting. Half of the plots were provided with 14C-enriched litter (∆14C ≈1000 ), and the other half with near-background litter (∆14C ≈220 ) over multiple years. Differences in the labeled leaf litter were used to quantify the movement of litter derived DOC through the soil profile. Soil solutions were collected over several years with tension lysimeters at 15 and 70 cm depth and measured for DOC concentration and 14C abundance. The net amount of DOC retained between 15 and 70 cm was 1.5-6 g m-2 y-1. There were significant effects of the litter additions on the 14C abundance in the DOC, but the net transport of 14C from the added litter was small.more » The difference in ∆14C between the treatments with enriched and near-background litter was only about 130 at both depths, which is small compared with the difference in Δ14C in the added litter. The primary source of DOC within the mineral soil must therefore have been either the Oe/Oa horizon or the organic matter in the mineral soil. Over a 2-year time frame, leaching of DOC from recent litter did not have a major impact on the C stock in the mineral soil below 15 cm in this ecosystem.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
931285
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Soil Science Society of America Journal; Journal Volume: 71; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ABUNDANCE; CARBON; ECOSYSTEMS; FLOORS; FORESTS; LEACHING; LYSIMETERS; OAKS; ORGANIC MATTER; ORNL; SOILS; TRANSPORT; USA

Citation Formats

Froeberg, Mats J, Jardine, Philip M, Hanson, Paul J, Swanston, Christopher, Todd Jr, Donald E, Phillips, Jana Randolph, and Garten Jr, Charles T. Low dissolved organic carbon input from fresh litter to deep mineral soils. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2136/sssaj2006.0188.
Froeberg, Mats J, Jardine, Philip M, Hanson, Paul J, Swanston, Christopher, Todd Jr, Donald E, Phillips, Jana Randolph, & Garten Jr, Charles T. Low dissolved organic carbon input from fresh litter to deep mineral soils. United States. doi:10.2136/sssaj2006.0188.
Froeberg, Mats J, Jardine, Philip M, Hanson, Paul J, Swanston, Christopher, Todd Jr, Donald E, Phillips, Jana Randolph, and Garten Jr, Charles T. Mon . "Low dissolved organic carbon input from fresh litter to deep mineral soils". United States. doi:10.2136/sssaj2006.0188.
@article{osti_931285,
title = {Low dissolved organic carbon input from fresh litter to deep mineral soils},
author = {Froeberg, Mats J and Jardine, Philip M and Hanson, Paul J and Swanston, Christopher and Todd Jr, Donald E and Phillips, Jana Randolph and Garten Jr, Charles T},
abstractNote = {Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from recent litter in the forest floor has been suggested to be an important source of C to the mineral soil of forest ecosystems. In order to determine the rate at which this flux of C occurs we have taken advantage of a local release of 14C at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Reservation, USA (latitude N 35 58'; longitude W 84 16'). Eight replicate 7x7 m plots were estab lished at four field sites on the reservation in an upland oak forest setting. Half of the plots were provided with 14C-enriched litter (∆14C ≈1000 ), and the other half with near-background litter (∆14C ≈220 ) over multiple years. Differences in the labeled leaf litter were used to quantify the movement of litter derived DOC through the soil profile. Soil solutions were collected over several years with tension lysimeters at 15 and 70 cm depth and measured for DOC concentration and 14C abundance. The net amount of DOC retained between 15 and 70 cm was 1.5-6 g m-2 y-1. There were significant effects of the litter additions on the 14C abundance in the DOC, but the net transport of 14C from the added litter was small. The difference in ∆14C between the treatments with enriched and near-background litter was only about 130 at both depths, which is small compared with the difference in Δ14C in the added litter. The primary source of DOC within the mineral soil must therefore have been either the Oe/Oa horizon or the organic matter in the mineral soil. Over a 2-year time frame, leaching of DOC from recent litter did not have a major impact on the C stock in the mineral soil below 15 cm in this ecosystem.},
doi = {10.2136/sssaj2006.0188},
journal = {Soil Science Society of America Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 71,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}