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Title: Low dissolved organic carbon input from fresh litter to deep mineral soils

Abstract

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from recent litter in the forest floor has been suggested to be an important source of C to the mineral soil of forest ecosystems. In order to determine the rate at which this flux of C occurs we have taken advantage of a local release of 14C at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Reservation, USA (latitude N 35 58'; longitude W 84 16'). Eight replicate 7x7 m plots were estab lished at four field sites on the reservation in an upland oak forest setting. Half of the plots were provided with 14C-enriched litter (∆14C ≈1000 ), and the other half with near-background litter (∆14C ≈220 ) over multiple years. Differences in the labeled leaf litter were used to quantify the movement of litter derived DOC through the soil profile. Soil solutions were collected over several years with tension lysimeters at 15 and 70 cm depth and measured for DOC concentration and 14C abundance. The net amount of DOC retained between 15 and 70 cm was 1.5-6 g m-2 y-1. There were significant effects of the litter additions on the 14C abundance in the DOC, but the net transport of 14C from the added litter was small.more » The difference in ∆14C between the treatments with enriched and near-background litter was only about 130 at both depths, which is small compared with the difference in Δ14C in the added litter. The primary source of DOC within the mineral soil must therefore have been either the Oe/Oa horizon or the organic matter in the mineral soil. Over a 2-year time frame, leaching of DOC from recent litter did not have a major impact on the C stock in the mineral soil below 15 cm in this ecosystem.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
931285
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Soil Science Society of America Journal; Journal Volume: 71; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ABUNDANCE; CARBON; ECOSYSTEMS; FLOORS; FORESTS; LEACHING; LYSIMETERS; OAKS; ORGANIC MATTER; ORNL; SOILS; TRANSPORT; USA

Citation Formats

Froeberg, Mats J, Jardine, Philip M, Hanson, Paul J, Swanston, Christopher, Todd Jr, Donald E, Phillips, Jana Randolph, and Garten Jr, Charles T. Low dissolved organic carbon input from fresh litter to deep mineral soils. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2136/sssaj2006.0188.
Froeberg, Mats J, Jardine, Philip M, Hanson, Paul J, Swanston, Christopher, Todd Jr, Donald E, Phillips, Jana Randolph, & Garten Jr, Charles T. Low dissolved organic carbon input from fresh litter to deep mineral soils. United States. doi:10.2136/sssaj2006.0188.
Froeberg, Mats J, Jardine, Philip M, Hanson, Paul J, Swanston, Christopher, Todd Jr, Donald E, Phillips, Jana Randolph, and Garten Jr, Charles T. Mon . "Low dissolved organic carbon input from fresh litter to deep mineral soils". United States. doi:10.2136/sssaj2006.0188.
@article{osti_931285,
title = {Low dissolved organic carbon input from fresh litter to deep mineral soils},
author = {Froeberg, Mats J and Jardine, Philip M and Hanson, Paul J and Swanston, Christopher and Todd Jr, Donald E and Phillips, Jana Randolph and Garten Jr, Charles T},
abstractNote = {Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from recent litter in the forest floor has been suggested to be an important source of C to the mineral soil of forest ecosystems. In order to determine the rate at which this flux of C occurs we have taken advantage of a local release of 14C at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Reservation, USA (latitude N 35 58'; longitude W 84 16'). Eight replicate 7x7 m plots were estab lished at four field sites on the reservation in an upland oak forest setting. Half of the plots were provided with 14C-enriched litter (∆14C ≈1000 ), and the other half with near-background litter (∆14C ≈220 ) over multiple years. Differences in the labeled leaf litter were used to quantify the movement of litter derived DOC through the soil profile. Soil solutions were collected over several years with tension lysimeters at 15 and 70 cm depth and measured for DOC concentration and 14C abundance. The net amount of DOC retained between 15 and 70 cm was 1.5-6 g m-2 y-1. There were significant effects of the litter additions on the 14C abundance in the DOC, but the net transport of 14C from the added litter was small. The difference in ∆14C between the treatments with enriched and near-background litter was only about 130 at both depths, which is small compared with the difference in Δ14C in the added litter. The primary source of DOC within the mineral soil must therefore have been either the Oe/Oa horizon or the organic matter in the mineral soil. Over a 2-year time frame, leaching of DOC from recent litter did not have a major impact on the C stock in the mineral soil below 15 cm in this ecosystem.},
doi = {10.2136/sssaj2006.0188},
journal = {Soil Science Society of America Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 71,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Physico-chemical sorption of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on soil minerals is one of the major processes of organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils, especially in deeper layers. The attachment of C on soil solids is related to the reactivity of the soil minerals and the chemistry of the sorbate functional groups, but the sorption studies conducted without controlling microbial activity may overestimate the sorption potential of soil. This study was conducted to examine the sorptive characteristics of a diverse functional groups of simple OC compounds (D-glucose, L-alanine, oxalic acid, salicylic acid, and sinapyl alcohol) on temperate climate soil orders (Mollisols,more » Ultisols and Alfisols) with and without biological degradative processes. Equilibrium batch experiments were conducted using 0-100 mg C L-1 at a solid-solution ratio of 1:60 for 48 hrs and the sorption parameters were calculated by Langmuir model fitting. The amount of added compounds that remained in the solution phase was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and total organic C (TOC) analysis. Soil sterilization was performed by -irradiation technique and experiments were repeated to determine the contribution of microbial degradation to apparent sorption. Overall, Ultisols did not show a marked preference for apparent sorption of any of the model compounds, as indicated by a narrower range of maximum sorption capacity (Smax) of 173-527 mg kg soil-1 across compounds. Mollisols exhibited a strong preference for apparent sorption of oxalic acid (Smax of 5290 mg kg soil-1) and sinapyl alcohol (Smax of 2031 mg kg soil-1) over the other compounds. The propensity for sorption of oxalic acid is mainly attributed to the precipitation of insoluble Ca-oxalate due to the calcareous nature of most Mollisol subsoils and its preference for sinapyl alcohol could be linked to the polymerization of this lignin monomer on 2:2 mineral dominated soils. The reactivity of Alfisols to DOC was in between that of Ultisols and Mollisols. HPLC results revealed significantly higher sorption of D-glucose and L-alanine than did TOC results, and duplicate experiments with sterilized soils confirmed that glucose and alanine were mineralized leading to higher apparent sorption values via HPLC. This study demonstrated that three common temperate soil orders experienced differential sorption of simple OC compounds, indicating that sorbate chemistry plays a significant role in the sorptive stabilization of DOC.« less
  • Incorporation of organic waste amendments to a horticultural soil, prior to expected risk periods, could immobilise mineral N, ultimately reducing nitrogen (N) losses as nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and leaching. Two organic waste amendments were selected, a fresh green waste (FGW) and green waste compost (GWC) as they had suitable biochemical attributes to initiate N immobilisation into the microbial biomass and organic N forms. These characteristics include a high C:N ratio (FGW 44:1, GWC 35:1), low total N (<1%), and high lignin content (>14%). Both products were applied at 3 t C/ha to a high N (plus N fertiliser) ormore » low N (no fertiliser addition) Vertisol soil in PVC columns. Cumulative N{sub 2}O production over the 28 day incubation from the control soil was 1.5 mg/N{sub 2}O/m{sup 2}, and 11 mg/N{sub 2}O/m{sup 2} from the control + N. The N{sub 2}O emission decreased with GWC addition (P < 0.05) for the high N soil, reducing cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions by 38% by the conclusion of the incubation. Analysis of mineral N concentrations at 7, 14 and 28 days identified that both FGW and GWC induced microbial immobilisation of N in the first 7 days of incubation regardless of whether the soil environment was initially high or low in N; with the FGW immobilising up to 30% of available N. It is likely that the reduced mineral N due to N immobilisation led to a reduced substrate for N{sub 2}O production during the first week of the trial, when soil N{sub 2}O emissions peaked. An additional finding was that FGW + N did not decrease cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions compared to the control + N, potentially due to the fact that it stimulated microbial respiration resulting in anaerobic micro sites in the soil and ultimately N{sub 2}O production via denitrification. Therefore, both materials could be used as post harvest amendments in horticulture to minimise N loss through nitrate-N leaching in the risk periods between crop rotations. The mature GWC has potential to reduce N{sub 2}O, an important greenhouse gas.« less
  • The apparent enhanced transport of soil-applied atrazine following irrigation of treated effluents has been hypothesized to be from complexation of atrazine with effluent-borne dissolved organic matter (DOM). Under long-term effluent irrigation, even small DOM-induced decreases in pesticide sorption can result in significant enhanced pesticide movement due to cumulative effects. The effect of atrazine and prometryn association with DOM extracted from municipal wastewater (MW), swine-derived lagoon wastewater (SW), and dissolved Aldrich humic acid (HA) on sorption by two soils was measured in batch equilibration studies. Individual association of pesticides to DOM, sorption of DOM to soil, and pesticide sorption by soilmore » were also quantified. Pesticide association to DOM normalized to organic carbon (OC) ranged from 30 to 1000 L/kg OC. DOM sorption by soil ranged from 1.5 to 10 L/kg with a silt loam having a higher affinity for the DOM than the sandy loam. DOM up to 150 mg OC/L did not significantly suppress sorption by soils of either atrazine or prometryne in agreement with predictions using the independently measured binary distribution coefficients in a model that assumed linear equilibrium behavior among pesticide, soil, and DOM. A sensitivity analysis was performed using the same model to identify what combination of soil, pesticide, and DOC variables may suppress sorption, resulting in facilitated transport. Results from the sensitivity analysis are presented and the potential for effluent properties other than DOM to facilitate pesticide transport is discussed.« less
  • Pseudomonas acidovorans and Pseudomonas sp. strain ANL but not Salmonella typhimurium grew in an inorganic salts solution. The growth of P. acidovorans in this solution was not enhanced by the addition of 2.0 ..mu..g of phenol per liter, but the phenol was mineralized. Mineralization of 2.0 ..mu..g of phenol per liter by P. acidovorans was delayed 16 h by 70 ..mu..g of acetate per liter, and the delay was lengthened by increasing acetate concentrations, whereas phenol and acetate were utilized simultaneously at concentrations of 2.0 and 13 ..mu..g/liter, respectively. Growth of Pseudomonas sp. in the inorganic salts solution was notmore » affected by the addition of 3.0 ..mu..g each of glucose and aniline per liter, nor was mineralization of the two compounds detected during the initial period of growth. However, mineralization of both substrates by this organism occurred simultaneously during the latter phases of growth and after growth had ended at the expense of the uncharacterized dissolved organic compounds in the salts solution. In contrast, when Pseudomonas sp. was grown in the salts solution supplemented with 300 ..mu..g each of glucose and aniline, the sugar was mineralized first, and aniline was mineralized only after much of the glucose carbon was converted to CO/sub 2/. S. typhimurium failed to multiply in the salts solution with 1.0 ..mu..g of glucose per liter. It grew slightly but mineralized little of the sugar at 5.0 ..mu..g/liter, but its population density rose at 10 ..mu..g of glucose per liter or higher. The hexose could be mineralized at 0.5 ..mu..g/liter, however, if the solution contained 5.0 mg of arabinose per liter.« less