skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Effects of Macroporous Resin Size on Candida antarctica Lipase B Adsorption, Fraction of Active Molecules, and Catalytic Activity for Polyester Synthesis

Abstract

Methyl methacrylate resins with identical average pore diameter (250 {angstrom}) and surface area (500 m{sup 2}/g) but with varied particle size (35 to 560-710 {mu}m) were employed to study how immobilization resin particle size influences Candida antarctica Lipase B (CALB) loading, fraction of active sites, and catalytic properties for polyester synthesis. CALB adsorbed more rapidly on smaller beads. Saturation occurred in less than 30 s and 48 h for beads with diameters 35 and 560-710 {mu}m, respectively. Linearization of adsorption isotherm data by the Scatchard analysis showed for the 35 {mu}m resin that: (1) CALB loading at saturation was well below that required to form a monolayer and fully cover the support surface and (2) CALB has a high affinity for this resin surface. Infrared microspectroscopy showed that CALB forms protein loading fronts for resins with particle sizes 560-710 and 120 {mu}m. In contrast, CALB appears evenly distributed throughout 35 {mu}m resins. By titration with p-nitrophenyl n-hexyl phosphate (MNPHP), the fraction of active CALB molecules adsorbed onto resins was <50% which was not influenced by particle size. The fraction of active CALB molecules on the 35 {mu}m support increased from 30 to 43% as enzyme loading was increased from 0.9more » to 5.7% (w/w) leading to increased activity for {epsilon}-caprolactone ({epsilon}-CL) ring-opening polymerization. At about 5% w/w CALB loading, by decreasing the immobilization support diameter from 560-710 to 120, 75, and 35 {mu}m, conversion of {epsilon}-CL % to polyester increased (20 to 36, 42, and 61%, respectively, at 80 min). Similar trends were observed for condensation polymerizations between 1,8-octanediol and adipic acid.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
929856
Report Number(s):
BNL-80422-2008-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0743-7463; LANGD5; TRN: US200822%%1049
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Langmuir; Journal Volume: 23
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ADIPIC ACID; ADSORPTION; ADSORPTION ISOTHERMS; AFFINITY; ENZYMES; LIPASES; METHACRYLIC ACID ESTERS; MOLECULES; PARTICLE SIZE; PHOSPHATES; POLYESTERS; POLYMERIZATION; PROTEINS; RESINS; SURFACES; SYNTHESIS; TITRATION; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Chen,B., Miller, E., Miller, L., Maikner, J., and Gross, R. Effects of Macroporous Resin Size on Candida antarctica Lipase B Adsorption, Fraction of Active Molecules, and Catalytic Activity for Polyester Synthesis. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1021/la062258u.
Chen,B., Miller, E., Miller, L., Maikner, J., & Gross, R. Effects of Macroporous Resin Size on Candida antarctica Lipase B Adsorption, Fraction of Active Molecules, and Catalytic Activity for Polyester Synthesis. United States. doi:10.1021/la062258u.
Chen,B., Miller, E., Miller, L., Maikner, J., and Gross, R. Mon . "Effects of Macroporous Resin Size on Candida antarctica Lipase B Adsorption, Fraction of Active Molecules, and Catalytic Activity for Polyester Synthesis". United States. doi:10.1021/la062258u.
@article{osti_929856,
title = {Effects of Macroporous Resin Size on Candida antarctica Lipase B Adsorption, Fraction of Active Molecules, and Catalytic Activity for Polyester Synthesis},
author = {Chen,B. and Miller, E. and Miller, L. and Maikner, J. and Gross, R.},
abstractNote = {Methyl methacrylate resins with identical average pore diameter (250 {angstrom}) and surface area (500 m{sup 2}/g) but with varied particle size (35 to 560-710 {mu}m) were employed to study how immobilization resin particle size influences Candida antarctica Lipase B (CALB) loading, fraction of active sites, and catalytic properties for polyester synthesis. CALB adsorbed more rapidly on smaller beads. Saturation occurred in less than 30 s and 48 h for beads with diameters 35 and 560-710 {mu}m, respectively. Linearization of adsorption isotherm data by the Scatchard analysis showed for the 35 {mu}m resin that: (1) CALB loading at saturation was well below that required to form a monolayer and fully cover the support surface and (2) CALB has a high affinity for this resin surface. Infrared microspectroscopy showed that CALB forms protein loading fronts for resins with particle sizes 560-710 and 120 {mu}m. In contrast, CALB appears evenly distributed throughout 35 {mu}m resins. By titration with p-nitrophenyl n-hexyl phosphate (MNPHP), the fraction of active CALB molecules adsorbed onto resins was <50% which was not influenced by particle size. The fraction of active CALB molecules on the 35 {mu}m support increased from 30 to 43% as enzyme loading was increased from 0.9 to 5.7% (w/w) leading to increased activity for {epsilon}-caprolactone ({epsilon}-CL) ring-opening polymerization. At about 5% w/w CALB loading, by decreasing the immobilization support diameter from 560-710 to 120, 75, and 35 {mu}m, conversion of {epsilon}-CL % to polyester increased (20 to 36, 42, and 61%, respectively, at 80 min). Similar trends were observed for condensation polymerizations between 1,8-octanediol and adipic acid.},
doi = {10.1021/la062258u},
journal = {Langmuir},
number = ,
volume = 23,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Polystyrene resins with varied particle sizes (35 to 350-600 {mu}m) and pore diameters (300-1000 {angstrom}) were employed to study the effects of immobilization resin particle size and pore diameter on Candida antarctica Lipase B (CALB) loading, distribution within resins, fraction of active sites, and catalytic properties for polyester synthesis. CALB adsorbed rapidly (saturation time {<=}4 min) for particle sizes 120 {mu}m (pore size = 300 {angstrom}). Infrared microspectroscopy showed that CALB forms protein loading fronts regardless of resin particle size at similar enzyme loadings ({approx}8%). From the IR images, the fractions of total surface area available to the enzyme aremore » 21, 33, 35, 37, and 88% for particle sizes 350-600, 120, 75, 35 {mu}m (pore size 300 {angstrom}), and 35 {mu}m (pore size 1000 {angstrom}), respectively. Titration with methyl p-nitrophenyl n-hexylphosphate (MNPHP) showed that the fraction of active CALB molecules adsorbed onto resins was {approx}60%. The fraction of active CALB molecules was invariable as a function of resin particle and pore size. At {approx}8% (w/w) CALB loading, by increasing the immobilization support pore diameter from 300 to 1000 {angstrom}, the turnover frequency (TOF) of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone ({var_epsilon}-CL) to polyester increased from 12.4 to 28.2 s{sup -1}. However, the {var_epsilon}-CL conversion rate was not influenced by changes in resin particle size. Similar trends were observed for condensation polymerizations between 1,8-octanediol and adipic acid. The results herein are compared to those obtained with a similar series of methyl methacrylate resins, where variations in particle size largely affected CALB distribution within resins and catalyst activity for polyester synthesis.« less
  • Candida antarctica Lipase B (CALB) was covalently immobilized onto epoxy-activated macroporous poly(methyl methacrylate) Amberzyme beads (235 {mu}m particle size, 220 Angstroms pore size) and nanoparticles (nanoPSG, diameter 68 nm) with a poly(glycidyl methacrylate) outer region. Amberzyme beads allowed CALB loading up to 0.16 g of enzyme per gram of support. IR microspectroscopy generated images of Amberzyme-CALB beads showed CALB is localized within a 50 {mu}m thick loading front. IR microspectroscopy images, recorded prior to and after treatment of Amberzyme-CALB with DMSO/aqueous Triton X-100, are similar, confirming that CALB is largely chemically linked to Amberzyme. The activity of CALB immobilized onmore » Amberzyme, Lewatit (i.e., Novozym 435 catalyst), and nanoPSG was assessed for lactone ring-opening and step-condensation polymerizations. For example, the percent conversion of -caprolactone using the same amount of enzyme catalyzed by Amberzym-CALB, Novozym 435, and nanoPSG-CALB for 20 min was 7.0, 16, and 65%, respectively. Differences in CALB reactivity were discussed based on resin physical parameters and availability of active sites determined by active site titrations. Regardless of the matrix used and chemical versus physical immobilization, -CL ring-opening polymerizations occur by a chain growth mechanism without chain termination. To test Amberzyme-CALB stability, the catalyst was reused over three reaction cycles for -CL ring-opening polymerization (70 C, 70 min reactions) and glycerol/1, 8-octanediol/adipic acid polycondensation reactions (90 C, 64 h). Amberzyme-CALB was found to have far better stability for reuse relative to Novozym 435 for the polycondensation reaction.« less
  • Circular permutation of Candida antarctica lipase B yields several enzyme variants with substantially increased catalytic activity. To better understand the structural and functional consequences of protein termini reorganization, we have applied protein engineering and x-ray crystallography to cp283, one of the most active hydrolase variants. Our initial investigation has focused on the role of an extended surface loop, created by linking the native N- and C-termini, on protein integrity. Incremental truncation of the loop partially compensates for observed losses in secondary structure and the permutants temperature of unfolding. Unexpectedly, the improvements are accompanied by quaternary-structure changes from monomer to dimer.more » The crystal structures of one truncated variant (cp283{Delta}7) in the apo-form determined at 1.49 {angstrom} resolution and with a bound phosphonate inhibitor at 1.69 {angstrom} resolution confirmed the formation of a homodimer by swapping of the enzyme's 35-residue N-terminal region. Separately, the new protein termini at amino acid positions 282/283 convert the narrow access tunnel to the catalytic triad into a broad crevice for accelerated substrate entry and product exit while preserving the native active-site topology for optimal catalytic turnover.« less
  • Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) is an established biocatalyst for a variety of transesterification, amidation, and polymerization reactions. In contrast to polyesters, polyamides are not yet generally accessible via enzymatic polymerization. In this regard, an enzyme-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of {beta}-lactam (2-azetidinone) using CALB is the first example of an enzymatic polyamide formation yielding unbranched poly({beta}-alanine), nylon 3. The performance of this polymerization, however, is poor, considering the maximum chain length of 18 monomer units with an average length of 8, and the molecular basis of the reaction so far is not understood. We have employed molecular modeling techniques using dockingmore » tools, molecular dynamics, and QM/MM procedures to gain insight into the mechanistic details of the various reaction steps involved. As a result, we propose a catalytic cycle for the oligomerization of {beta}-lactam that rationalizes the activation of the monomer, the chain elongation by additional {beta}-lactam molecules, and the termination of the polymer chain. In addition, the processes leading to a premature chain termination are studied. Particularly, the QM/MM calculation enables an atomistic description of all eight steps involved in the catalytic cycle, which features an in situ-generated {beta}-alanine as the elongating monomer and which is compatible with the experimental findings.« less
  • Hybrid three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) SiO{sub 2}-SO{sub 3}H materials with different S/Si ratio have been prepared by colloidal crystal templating method. The process involved preparation of 3DOM SiO{sub 2}-SH materials by co-condensation of (3-mercaptopropyl)triethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane via sol-gel transformation, and following oxidation of -SH group to -SO{sub 3}H group by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infra-red spectrometer (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and nitrogen adsorption measurement. SEM observation shows that the macropores are highly ordered with a typical 'surface-templated' structure. The surface area of 3DOM SiO{sub 2}-SH material is 25.1 m{sup 2}/g andmore » SiO{sub 2}-SO{sub 3}H material is 18.6 m{sup 2}/g. Catalytic activity test shows that 3DOM SiO{sub 2}-SO{sub 3}H materials possess a high activity for the esterification of acetic acid and n-butanol, and the activity is increased with the amount of sulfur in the materials. This study provided significant results for developing new application of 3DOM materials.« less