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Title: Criteria and techniques for field characterization and modelingrelated to selecting and evaluating performance of LILW disposalsites

Abstract

Argentina is faced with the challenging problem ofdeveloping technology for near-surface disposal and isolation of low- andintermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW). The preferred option fordisposal of LILW (including both relatively short-lived and long-livedradionuclides) is to use disposal facilities that arenear-surface--either above or below ground level [IAEA, 1985; 2001a;2004]. How individual components of a waste disposal system perform(including waste forms, waste containers, engineered barriers and hostenvironment) will determine system safety and the safety of thesurrounding environment [IAEA, 1999]. The lack of appropriate engineeringfor the backfill, and for the selection of sealing and covering materialsfor trenches, vaults, and ditches, could result in the escape ofradionuclides from the disposed wastes [IAEA, 1994a; 2001b]. Therefore,assessment and design of backfill, barriers, and cover materials are veryimportant, both for preventing invasion of water into the disposalsystem, and for retarding radionuclides that could potentially migratefrom the system into the atmosphere or groundwater [IAEA, 1982; 1994b;2001a].

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.Waste Management System
OSTI Identifier:
929491
Report Number(s):
LBNL-63360
R&D Project: G60691; BnR: DF0961000; TRN: US0803597
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2nd Workshop on Conceptual and Numerical Modelingfor Radioactive Waste Repositories: Theoretical and Experimental Studiesfor Site Selection, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 26-27 April2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; ARGENTINA; CONTAINERS; DESIGN; GROUND LEVEL; IAEA; INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; PERFORMANCE; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; RADIOISOTOPES; SAFETY; SIMULATION; SITE SELECTION; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE FORMS; WASTES; WATER

Citation Formats

Faybishenko, Boris, and Witherspoon, Paul A. Criteria and techniques for field characterization and modelingrelated to selecting and evaluating performance of LILW disposalsites. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Faybishenko, Boris, & Witherspoon, Paul A. Criteria and techniques for field characterization and modelingrelated to selecting and evaluating performance of LILW disposalsites. United States.
Faybishenko, Boris, and Witherspoon, Paul A. Fri . "Criteria and techniques for field characterization and modelingrelated to selecting and evaluating performance of LILW disposalsites". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/929491.
@article{osti_929491,
title = {Criteria and techniques for field characterization and modelingrelated to selecting and evaluating performance of LILW disposalsites},
author = {Faybishenko, Boris and Witherspoon, Paul A.},
abstractNote = {Argentina is faced with the challenging problem ofdeveloping technology for near-surface disposal and isolation of low- andintermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW). The preferred option fordisposal of LILW (including both relatively short-lived and long-livedradionuclides) is to use disposal facilities that arenear-surface--either above or below ground level [IAEA, 1985; 2001a;2004]. How individual components of a waste disposal system perform(including waste forms, waste containers, engineered barriers and hostenvironment) will determine system safety and the safety of thesurrounding environment [IAEA, 1999]. The lack of appropriate engineeringfor the backfill, and for the selection of sealing and covering materialsfor trenches, vaults, and ditches, could result in the escape ofradionuclides from the disposed wastes [IAEA, 1994a; 2001b]. Therefore,assessment and design of backfill, barriers, and cover materials are veryimportant, both for preventing invasion of water into the disposalsystem, and for retarding radionuclides that could potentially migratefrom the system into the atmosphere or groundwater [IAEA, 1982; 1994b;2001a].},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 12 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 12 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

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