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Title: Mechanism of Bacterial Uranium and Technetium Reduction

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
926533
Report Number(s):
CONF/ERSP2007-1026708
R&D Project: ERSD 1026708
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Annual Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP) Principal Investigator Meeting, April 16-19, 2007, Lansdowne, VA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Thomas DiChristina. Mechanism of Bacterial Uranium and Technetium Reduction. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Thomas DiChristina. Mechanism of Bacterial Uranium and Technetium Reduction. United States.
Thomas DiChristina. Thu . "Mechanism of Bacterial Uranium and Technetium Reduction". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/926533.
@article{osti_926533,
title = {Mechanism of Bacterial Uranium and Technetium Reduction},
author = {Thomas DiChristina},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 19 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Apr 19 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(II)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-I0S simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does notmore » allow for re-oxidization to the mobile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period of time (6 weeks). Previous work indicated that the Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(II)apatite exhibits a direct correlation with the pH of the contaminated media. Table 1 shows Sn(II)apatite distribution coefficients as a function of pH. The asterisked numbers indicate that the lower detection limit of the analytical instrument was used to calculate the distribution coefficient as the concentration of technetium left in solution was less than the detection limit.« less
  • This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(lI)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-105 simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(ll)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allowmore » for re-oxidization to the mobile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period of time (6 weeks). Previous work indicated that the Sn(II) apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(lI)apatite exhibited a direct correlation with the pH of the technetium-spiked simulant media.« less
  • Analyses were performed using the US Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) core design to determine the feasibility of using it as an {sup 99}Tc burner while reducing the sodium-void coefficient. A layer of {sup 99}Tc of variable thickness was inserted around the core midplane in Rows 2 through 5 and all blanket assemblies were replaced with fuel assemblies. The results indicate that a core with a 34-cm-thick layer in Rows 2 through 5 has the optimum characteristics of sodium-void coefficient, {sup 99}Tc destruction rate, and fuel enrichment.
  • The isotopemore » $sup 99$Tc (T $sup 1$/$sub 2$, 2.15 x 10$sup 5$ years) is produced by the spontaneous fission of $sup 238$U in nature and by the slow neutron fission of $sup 238$U in nuclear reactors. In the latter case, the potential exists for Tc entrance into the environment in emissions from nuclear reactors, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, and other facilities which use Tc for commercial purposes. Results are reported from studies on Tc uptake by plants. The most stable chemical species of Tc in aqueous solution is the pertechnetate ion (TcO$sub 4$$sup -1$), and it is this form which is most likely to enter surface soils. Recent studies indicated that at least over the short term, pertechnetate is soluble and highly mobile in most soils and is sorbed in significant quantities only in high organic matter, low pH soils. Plant availability normally increases with increased ion solubility in soil provided the ion is not discriminated against at the plant root level. Furthermore, the aqueous chemistry of pertechnetate is similar in several respects to permanganate and molybdate, compounds of elements essential in plant nutrition. Experiments were undertaken to determine the uptake and distribution of Tc in plants as a function of time using soybeans (Glycine max) and $sup 99$Tc as a tracer. (CH)« less