skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Characterization of nanoparticle formation and aggregation on mineral surfaces

Abstract

The research effort in the Waychunas group is focused on the characterization and measurement of processes at the mineral-water interfaces specifically related to the onset of precipitation. This effort maps into one of the main project groups with the Penn State University EMSI (CEKA) known as PIG (Precipitation Interest Group), and involves collaborations with several members of that group. Both synchrotron experimentation and technique development are objectives, with the goals of allowing precipitation from single molecule attachment to sub-monolayer coverage to be detected and analyzed. The problem being addressed is the change in reactivity of mineral interfaces due to passivation or activation by precipitates or sorbates. In the case of passivation, fewer active sites may be involved in reactions with environmental fluids, while in the activated case the precipitate may be much more reactive than the substrate, or result in the creation of a higher density of active sites. We approach this problem by making direct measurements of several types of precipitation reactions: iron-aluminum oxide formation on quartz and other substrates from both homogeneous (in solution) nucleation, and heterogeneous (on the surface) nucleation; precipitation and sorption of silicate monomers and polymers on Fe oxide surfaces; and development of grazing-incidence smallmore » angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) as a tool for in-situ measurement of precipitate growth, morphology and aggregation. We expect that these projects will produce new fundamental information on reactive interface growth, passivation and activation, and be applicable to a wide range of environmental interfaces.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
926150
Report Number(s):
CONF/ERSP2007-1024944
R&D Project: ERSD 1024944; TRN: US0802496
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Annual Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP) Principal Investigator Meeting, April 16-19, 2007, Lansdowne, VA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; MONOMERS; MORPHOLOGY; NUCLEATION; OXIDES; PASSIVATION; POLYMERS; PRECIPITATION; QUARTZ; SCATTERING; SILICATES; SORPTION; SUBSTRATES; SYNCHROTRONS

Citation Formats

Glenn Waychunas, and Young-Shin Jun. Characterization of nanoparticle formation and aggregation on mineral surfaces. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Glenn Waychunas, & Young-Shin Jun. Characterization of nanoparticle formation and aggregation on mineral surfaces. United States.
Glenn Waychunas, and Young-Shin Jun. Thu . "Characterization of nanoparticle formation and aggregation on mineral surfaces". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/926150.
@article{osti_926150,
title = {Characterization of nanoparticle formation and aggregation on mineral surfaces},
author = {Glenn Waychunas and Young-Shin Jun},
abstractNote = {The research effort in the Waychunas group is focused on the characterization and measurement of processes at the mineral-water interfaces specifically related to the onset of precipitation. This effort maps into one of the main project groups with the Penn State University EMSI (CEKA) known as PIG (Precipitation Interest Group), and involves collaborations with several members of that group. Both synchrotron experimentation and technique development are objectives, with the goals of allowing precipitation from single molecule attachment to sub-monolayer coverage to be detected and analyzed. The problem being addressed is the change in reactivity of mineral interfaces due to passivation or activation by precipitates or sorbates. In the case of passivation, fewer active sites may be involved in reactions with environmental fluids, while in the activated case the precipitate may be much more reactive than the substrate, or result in the creation of a higher density of active sites. We approach this problem by making direct measurements of several types of precipitation reactions: iron-aluminum oxide formation on quartz and other substrates from both homogeneous (in solution) nucleation, and heterogeneous (on the surface) nucleation; precipitation and sorption of silicate monomers and polymers on Fe oxide surfaces; and development of grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) as a tool for in-situ measurement of precipitate growth, morphology and aggregation. We expect that these projects will produce new fundamental information on reactive interface growth, passivation and activation, and be applicable to a wide range of environmental interfaces.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 19 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Apr 19 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Decontamination and decommission (D&D) of a large number of nuclear facilities is a major effort at the Department of Energy's (DOE) complexes across the country. Use of laser plasma for surface decontamination/cleaning is a new and effective technique. A large quantity of very small particles (nanoparticles of diameter {approx} 100-200 nm with peaks in the 50 nm range) is produced during the decontamination process. Effective production of particles is critical in determining the surface cleaning efficiency. However, the particles could contain surface contaminants such as toxic heavy metals (e.g., Cr, Hg, Pb, and Ni), radionuclides (e.g., Th, Cs, and U),more » and organic solvents that all might cause health concerns. In this project sponsored by DOE Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP), we investigated the relationships of nanoparticle formation by the laser decontamination process using laboratory prepared target surfaces made from Portland cement (concrete), stainless steel 316, and pure alumina. The first two samples are commonly found in DOE installations, while the last sample is used for understanding of fundamental processes. The data were correlated among the particles, surface chemistry, and the laser characteristics. It was found that the lattice energy of the surface material and the mean free path of the nanoparticles produced appear to influence the particle growth. The experiments conducted to determine the threshold energy needed to remove particles from the surface materials were important in understanding the cleaning efficiency and the photon-atom interaction at the material surface. The experimental design and results of data analysis will be discussed in the meeting.« less
  • A dynamic method is described for dye adsorption measurements to characterize mineral and coal surfaces for the evaluation of coal cleaning processes. Samples of increasing mineral content were prepared by density separation of a narrowly sized (300 to 425 /mu/m) wet-sieved coal. The rates and extents of the adsorption of ionic dyes on Illinois No. 6 coal were observed to be highly dependent on mineral content and particle size of ground coal samples. A linear correlation was observed between the adsorbed quantity of dye and the total mineral content of coal samples. Dry-sieved coals were found to be coated bymore » fine material of high mineral ash content which adsorbed greater than 20 times more methylene blue per gram than wet-sieved particles. In preliminary experiments with methylene blue dye, clay was found to adsorb significantly more dye than quartz, pyrite, calcite or low-ash specific gravity fractions of coal.« less
  • Abstract not provided.