skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

Abstract

Three potential additives for controlling mercury emissions from syngas at temperatures ranging from 350 to 500 F (177 to 260 C) were developed. Current efforts are being directed at increasing the effective working temperature for these sorbents and also being able to either eliminate any potential mercury desorption or trying to engineer a trace metal removal system that can utilize the observed desorption process to repeatedly regenerate the same sorbent monolith for extended use. Project results also indicate that one of these same sorbents can also successfully be utilized for arsenic removal. Capture of the hydrogen selenide in the passivated tubing at elevated temperatures has resulted in limited results on the effective control of hydrogen selenide with these current sorbents, although lower-temperature results are promising. Preliminary economic analysis suggests that these Corning monoliths potentially could be more cost-effective than the conventional cold-gas (presulfided activated carbon beds) technology currently being utilized. Recent Hg-loading results might suggest that the annualized costs might be as high as 2.5 times the cost of the conventional technology. However, this annualized cost does not take into account the significantly improved thermal efficiency of any plant utilizing the warm-gas monolith technology currently being developed.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University Of North Dakota
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
924119
DOE Contract Number:  
FC26-05NT42461
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ADSORBENTS; ACTIVATED CARBON; MATERIALS TESTING; ARSENIC; REGENERATION; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; COAL GASIFICATION; MERCURY; REMOVAL; SELENIUM HYDRIDES; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL

Citation Formats

Michael L. Swanson, Grant E. Dunham, and Mark A. Musich. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/924119.
Michael L. Swanson, Grant E. Dunham, & Mark A. Musich. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps. United States. doi:10.2172/924119.
Michael L. Swanson, Grant E. Dunham, and Mark A. Musich. Thu . "Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps". United States. doi:10.2172/924119. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/924119.
@article{osti_924119,
title = {Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps},
author = {Michael L. Swanson and Grant E. Dunham and Mark A. Musich},
abstractNote = {Three potential additives for controlling mercury emissions from syngas at temperatures ranging from 350 to 500 F (177 to 260 C) were developed. Current efforts are being directed at increasing the effective working temperature for these sorbents and also being able to either eliminate any potential mercury desorption or trying to engineer a trace metal removal system that can utilize the observed desorption process to repeatedly regenerate the same sorbent monolith for extended use. Project results also indicate that one of these same sorbents can also successfully be utilized for arsenic removal. Capture of the hydrogen selenide in the passivated tubing at elevated temperatures has resulted in limited results on the effective control of hydrogen selenide with these current sorbents, although lower-temperature results are promising. Preliminary economic analysis suggests that these Corning monoliths potentially could be more cost-effective than the conventional cold-gas (presulfided activated carbon beds) technology currently being utilized. Recent Hg-loading results might suggest that the annualized costs might be as high as 2.5 times the cost of the conventional technology. However, this annualized cost does not take into account the significantly improved thermal efficiency of any plant utilizing the warm-gas monolith technology currently being developed.},
doi = {10.2172/924119},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: