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Title: Assessment of XM-19 as a Substitute for AISI 348 in ATR Service

Abstract

It has been proposed that XM-19 alloy be considered as a possible replacement steel for AISI 348 in the construction of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) capsules. AISI 348 works well, but is currently very difficult to obtain commercially. The superior and desirable mechanical properties of XM-19 alloy have been proven in non-nuclear applications, but no data are available regarding its use in radiation environments. While most 300 series alloys will meet the conditions required in ATR , it cannot be confidently assumed that XM-19 can be substituted without prior qualification in a radiation test. Compared to AISI 348, XM-19 will have an enhanced tendency for phase instabilities due to its higher levels of Ni and, especially, Si. However, transmutation of important elemental components in the highly thermalized ATR spectrum may have a very pronounced effect on its performance during irradiation. Not only will strong transmutation of Mn to Fe reduce the ductility and strength advantages provided by the higher initial Mn content of XM-19, but the extensive loss of Mn will also release from solution much of the N upon which the higher strength of XM-19 depends. In addition, the combined influence of transmutation and Inverse Kirkendall processes may leadmore » to gas-bubble-covered grain boundaries, producing a very fragile alloy after significant irradiation has accumulated. At present, there are no radiation data available to substantiate this possible scenario. An alternate proposal is therefore advanced. Since the response of AISI 348 and 347 to radiation are expected to be relatively indistinguishable, the AISI 347 might serve as an acceptable replacement. While AISI 348 is usually chosen for nuclear service in order to reduce the overall radioactivity arising from relatively small amounts of highly transmutable elements such as cobalt, these elements have very little effect on the radiation performance of the steel. In the proposed application, however, the activity induced in this highly thermalized spectrum to large doses (10 to 50 dpa) will be overwhelmed by the activation arising from the major steel components: Fe, Cr, and especially Ni. The mechanical properties, irradiation creep, and void swelling behavior of the two steels should be practically indistinguishable.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
923501
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-07-13530
TRN: US200806%%416
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALLOYS; COBALT; CONSTRUCTION; CREEP; DUCTILITY; GRAIN BOUNDARIES; IRRADIATION; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; PERFORMANCE; RADIATIONS; RADIOACTIVITY; STEELS; SWELLING; TEST REACTORS; TRANSMUTATION; XM-19 alloy

Citation Formats

Garner, F A, Greenwood, L R, Mizia, R E, and Tyler, C R. Assessment of XM-19 as a Substitute for AISI 348 in ATR Service. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/923501.
Garner, F A, Greenwood, L R, Mizia, R E, & Tyler, C R. Assessment of XM-19 as a Substitute for AISI 348 in ATR Service. United States. doi:10.2172/923501.
Garner, F A, Greenwood, L R, Mizia, R E, and Tyler, C R. Thu . "Assessment of XM-19 as a Substitute for AISI 348 in ATR Service". United States. doi:10.2172/923501. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/923501.
@article{osti_923501,
title = {Assessment of XM-19 as a Substitute for AISI 348 in ATR Service},
author = {Garner, F A and Greenwood, L R and Mizia, R E and Tyler, C R},
abstractNote = {It has been proposed that XM-19 alloy be considered as a possible replacement steel for AISI 348 in the construction of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) capsules. AISI 348 works well, but is currently very difficult to obtain commercially. The superior and desirable mechanical properties of XM-19 alloy have been proven in non-nuclear applications, but no data are available regarding its use in radiation environments. While most 300 series alloys will meet the conditions required in ATR , it cannot be confidently assumed that XM-19 can be substituted without prior qualification in a radiation test. Compared to AISI 348, XM-19 will have an enhanced tendency for phase instabilities due to its higher levels of Ni and, especially, Si. However, transmutation of important elemental components in the highly thermalized ATR spectrum may have a very pronounced effect on its performance during irradiation. Not only will strong transmutation of Mn to Fe reduce the ductility and strength advantages provided by the higher initial Mn content of XM-19, but the extensive loss of Mn will also release from solution much of the N upon which the higher strength of XM-19 depends. In addition, the combined influence of transmutation and Inverse Kirkendall processes may lead to gas-bubble-covered grain boundaries, producing a very fragile alloy after significant irradiation has accumulated. At present, there are no radiation data available to substantiate this possible scenario. An alternate proposal is therefore advanced. Since the response of AISI 348 and 347 to radiation are expected to be relatively indistinguishable, the AISI 347 might serve as an acceptable replacement. While AISI 348 is usually chosen for nuclear service in order to reduce the overall radioactivity arising from relatively small amounts of highly transmutable elements such as cobalt, these elements have very little effect on the radiation performance of the steel. In the proposed application, however, the activity induced in this highly thermalized spectrum to large doses (10 to 50 dpa) will be overwhelmed by the activation arising from the major steel components: Fe, Cr, and especially Ni. The mechanical properties, irradiation creep, and void swelling behavior of the two steels should be practically indistinguishable.},
doi = {10.2172/923501},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2007},
month = {11}
}

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