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Title: Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Pollutedwith Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides

Abstract

Bioremediation of metals and radionuclides has had manyfield tests, demonstrations, and full-scale implementations in recentyears. Field research in this area has occurred for many different metalsand radionuclides using a wide array of strategies. These strategies canbe generally characterized in six major categories: biotransformation,bioaccumulation/bisorption, biodegradation of chelators, volatilization,treatment trains, and natural attenuation. For all field applicationsthere are a number of critical biogeochemical issues that most beaddressed for the successful field application. Monitoring andcharacterization parameters that are enabling to bioremediation of metalsand radionuclides are presented here. For each of the strategies a casestudy is presented to demonstrate a field application that uses thisstrategy.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. Biological andEnvironmental Research
OSTI Identifier:
923336
Report Number(s):
LBNL-60264
R&D Project: VGTLTH; BnR: KP1102010; TRN: US200804%%1069
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Reviews in Environmental Science and Biotechnology; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: August, 2005
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; 59; BIODEGRADATION; BIOREMEDIATION; EVAPORATION; FIELD TESTS; MONITORING; NATURAL ATTENUATION; RADIOISOTOPES; SEDIMENTS; SOILS; Biogeochemistry Bioremediation Environmental Genomics FieldStudies Stress Response

Citation Formats

Hazen, Terry C., and Tabak, Henry H. Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Pollutedwith Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Hazen, Terry C., & Tabak, Henry H. Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Pollutedwith Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides. United States.
Hazen, Terry C., and Tabak, Henry H. Thu . "Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Pollutedwith Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/923336.
@article{osti_923336,
title = {Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Pollutedwith Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides},
author = {Hazen, Terry C. and Tabak, Henry H.},
abstractNote = {Bioremediation of metals and radionuclides has had manyfield tests, demonstrations, and full-scale implementations in recentyears. Field research in this area has occurred for many different metalsand radionuclides using a wide array of strategies. These strategies canbe generally characterized in six major categories: biotransformation,bioaccumulation/bisorption, biodegradation of chelators, volatilization,treatment trains, and natural attenuation. For all field applicationsthere are a number of critical biogeochemical issues that most beaddressed for the successful field application. Monitoring andcharacterization parameters that are enabling to bioremediation of metalsand radionuclides are presented here. For each of the strategies a casestudy is presented to demonstrate a field application that uses thisstrategy.},
doi = {},
journal = {Reviews in Environmental Science and Biotechnology},
number = 3,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • The turnover of radionuclides in parts of the biosphere is usually modeled by use of a sorption distribution coefficient, K{sub d}. Its value has a large influence on calculated concentrations of long-lived radionuclides found in reservoirs, which are important for doses to humans. Sorption is due to several processes and a variety of physical and chemical interactions. In the commonly used K{sub d}-methodology. however, these processes were usually not considered explicitly. Additionally, many K{sub d} values were obtained from laboratory experiments from the geosphere, the conditions of which differ from those prevailing in the biosphere. The main objective of thismore » work was to extend the knowledge about the theoretical background for calculation of K{sub d} values. To achieve this objective, theoretical models for ion exchange and surface complexation were adapted to simulation under biospheric conditions. Elements studied were Cs, Ra, Np, U, and Pu. The results show that a triple-layer surface complexation model may be used to estimate K{sub d} values for actinides as functions of some chemical parameters, such as pH and the redox potential (E{sub H}). An area of application is performance assessment of radioactive waste repositories. 59 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.« less
  • To evaluate the adequacy of the equilibrium partitioning concept in predicting metal bioaccumulation, a soil invertebrate species was exposed in 20 Dutch field soils with moderate metal contamination. Earthworms (Eisenia andrei) were kept in the soils for 3 weeks under laboratory conditions. Bioconcentration factors (BCFs) for six metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni) and for As were calculated as the ratio of body- and solid-phase metal concentrations. Multivariate statistical analyses suggested that the BCFs for As, Cd, Cu, and Zn are governed by the same soil characteristics that determine equilibrium partition coefficients between the soil solid phase and themore » pore water. This suggests that uptake of metals is either direct from the pore water or indirect through an uptake route closely related to pore water. Regression equations were derived for predicting BCF values as a function of easily determinable soil characteristics. By means of internal validation it was shown that the equations obtained can be used for predictive purposes within the range of soil properties encountered in the dataset. Due to a lack of data, external validation was possible only in a qualitative sense.« less
  • Bioremediation stabilizes and reclaims radionuclide or toxic metal-contaminated materials, soils, sediments, or wastes; it then recovers the contaminating radionuclides and metals. Waste materials are stabilized and reduced in volume using anaerobic bacteria; or alternatively, materials are treated with citric acid before bioremediation begins. Photolysis is used after bioremediation to release radionuclides.
  • The highly chlorinated cogeners in commonly used commercial BCP mixtures are persistent in aerobic environments. Treatment of contaminated soils or sediments in situ has the potential for considerable cost savings compared with excavation and treatment in reactors. Field application vectors (FAVs) have been developed to create a temporary niche for the host bacterial strain in such environments. This paper describes the development of a FAV, previously used as a nontoxic selective substrate, for the degradation of PCBs through addition of recombinant plasmids carrying genes for the biphenyl metabolic pathway.28 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.
  • Many geochemical reactions that control aqueous metal concentrations are directly affected by solution pH. However, changes in solution pH are strongly buffered by various aqueous phase and solid phase precipitation/dissolution and adsorption/desorption reactions. The ability to predict acid-base behavior of the soil-solution system is thus critical to predict metal transport under variable pH conditions. This study was undertaken to develop a practical generic geochemical modeling approach to predict aqueous and solid phase concentrations of metals and anions during conditions of acid or base additions. The method of Spalding and Spalding was utilized to model soil buffer capacity and pH-dependent cationmore » exchange capacity by treating aquifer solids as a polyprotic acid. To simulate the dynamic and pH-dependent anion exchange capacity, the aquifer solids were simultaneously treated as a polyprotic base controlled by mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. An equilibrium reaction model that describes aqueous complexation, precipitation, sorption and soil buffering with pH-dependent ion exchange was developed using HydroGeoChem v5.0 (HGC5). Comparison of model results with experimental titration data of pH, Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for contaminated sediments indicated close agreement, suggesting that the model could potentially be used to predict the acid-base behavior of the sediment-solution system under variable pH conditions.« less