skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Development and Integration of Single-Asperity Nanotribology Experiments & Nanoscale Interface Finite Element Modeling for Prediction and Control of Friction and Damage in Micro- and Nano-mechnical Systems

Abstract

This report describes the accomplishments of the DOE BES grant entitled "Development and Integration of Single-Asperity Nanotribology Experiments & Nanoscale Interface Finite Element Modeling for Prediction and Control of Friction and Damage in Micro- and Nano-mechnical Systems". Key results are: the determination of nanoscale frictional properties of MEMS surfaces, self-assembled monolayers, and novel carbon-based films, as well as the development of models to describe this behavior.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
922930
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/46016-1
TRN: US201003%%673
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-02ER46016
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; FORECASTING; FRICTION; SIMULATION; Tribology, Friction, MEMS, Nanotribology, Surface Science, Finite Element Modelling, Contact Mechanics, Adhesion, Self-Assembled Monolayers, Nanocrystalline Diamond

Citation Formats

R.W. Carpick, and M.E. Plesha. Development and Integration of Single-Asperity Nanotribology Experiments & Nanoscale Interface Finite Element Modeling for Prediction and Control of Friction and Damage in Micro- and Nano-mechnical Systems. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/922930.
R.W. Carpick, & M.E. Plesha. Development and Integration of Single-Asperity Nanotribology Experiments & Nanoscale Interface Finite Element Modeling for Prediction and Control of Friction and Damage in Micro- and Nano-mechnical Systems. United States. doi:10.2172/922930.
R.W. Carpick, and M.E. Plesha. Sat . "Development and Integration of Single-Asperity Nanotribology Experiments & Nanoscale Interface Finite Element Modeling for Prediction and Control of Friction and Damage in Micro- and Nano-mechnical Systems". United States. doi:10.2172/922930. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/922930.
@article{osti_922930,
title = {Development and Integration of Single-Asperity Nanotribology Experiments & Nanoscale Interface Finite Element Modeling for Prediction and Control of Friction and Damage in Micro- and Nano-mechnical Systems},
author = {R.W. Carpick and M.E. Plesha},
abstractNote = {This report describes the accomplishments of the DOE BES grant entitled "Development and Integration of Single-Asperity Nanotribology Experiments & Nanoscale Interface Finite Element Modeling for Prediction and Control of Friction and Damage in Micro- and Nano-mechnical Systems". Key results are: the determination of nanoscale frictional properties of MEMS surfaces, self-assembled monolayers, and novel carbon-based films, as well as the development of models to describe this behavior.},
doi = {10.2172/922930},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Mar 03 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Sat Mar 03 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • Localized shear deformation plays an important role in a number of geotechnical and geological processes. Slope failures, the formation and propagation of faults, cracking in concrete dams, and shear fractures in subsiding hydrocarbon reservoirs are examples of important effects of shear localization. Traditional engineering analyses of these phenomena, such as limit equilibrium techniques, make certain assumptions on the shape of the failure surface as well as other simplifications. While these methods may be adequate for the applications for which they were designed, it is difficult to extrapolate the results to more general scenarios. An alternative approach is to use amore » numerical modeling technique, such as the finite element method, to predict localization. While standard finite elements can model a wide variety of loading situations and geometries quite well, for numerical reasons they have difficulty capturing the softening and anisotropic damage that accompanies localization. By introducing an enhancement to the element in the form of a fracture surface at an arbitrary position and orientation in the element, we can regularize the solution, model the weakening response, and track the relative motion of the surfaces. To properly model the slip along these surfaces, the traction-displacement response must be properly captured. This report focuses on the development of a constitutive model appropriate to localizing geomaterials, and the embedding of this model into the enhanced finite element framework. This modeling covers two distinct phases. The first, usually brief, phase is the weakening response as the material transitions from intact continuum to a body with a cohesionless fractured surface. Once the cohesion has been eliminated, the response along the surface is completely frictional. We have focused on a rate- and state-dependent frictional model that captures stable and unstable slip along the surface. This model is embedded numerically into the element using a generalized trapezoidal formulation. While the focus is on the constitutive model of interest, the framework is also developed for a general surface response. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project titled 'Cohesive Zone Modeling of Failure in Geomaterials: Formulation and Implementation of a Strong Discontinuity Model Incorporating the Effect of Slip Speed on Frictional Resistance'. This project supported a strategic partnership between Sandia National Laboratories and Stanford University by providing funding for the lead author, Craig Foster, during his doctoral research.« less
  • This report is a presentation of modeling and simulation work for analyzing three designs of Micro Electro Mechanical (MEM) Compound Pivot Mirrors (CPM). These CPMs were made at Sandia National Laboratories using the SUMMiT{trademark} process. At 75 volts and above, initial experimental analysis of fabricated mirrors showed tilt angles of up to 7.5 degrees for one design, and 5 degrees for the other two. Nevertheless, geometric design models predicted higher tilt angles. Therefore, a detailed study was conducted to explain why lower tilt angles occurred and if design modifications could be made to produce higher tilt angles at lower voltages.more » This study showed that the spring stiffnesses of the CPMs were too great to allow for desired levels of rotation at lower levels of voltage. To produce these lower stiffnesses, a redesign is needed.« less
  • Integrating renewable energy and distributed generations into the Smart Grid architecture requires power electronic (PE) for energy conversion. The key to reaching successful Smart Grid implementation is to develop interoperable, intelligent, and advanced PE technology that improves and accelerates the use of distributed energy resource systems. This report describes the simulation, design, and testing of a single-phase DC-to-AC inverter developed to operate in both islanded and utility-connected mode. It provides results on both the simulations and the experiments conducted, demonstrating the ability of the inverter to provide advanced control functions such as power flow and VAR/voltage regulation. This report alsomore » analyzes two different techniques used for digital signal processor (DSP) code generation. Initially, the DSP code was written in C programming language using Texas Instrument's Code Composer Studio. In a later stage of the research, the Simulink DSP toolbox was used to self-generate code for the DSP. The successful tests using Simulink self-generated DSP codes show promise for fast prototyping of PE controls.« less
  • Volume 1 of this report describes the development of three-dimensional vector potential finite element techniques for the calculation of 3-D magnetic fields in turbine-generators and other devices. Both nonlinear magnetostatic and linear eddy current versions were successfully formulated and verified against known analytical solutions or simple tests. The magnetostatic version was demonstrated on turbine-generator geometry. Volume 2 describes the application of 2-D finite element techniques for the calculation of generator equivalent circuit models for system simulation studies. Results of the calculation of operational inductances are validated by test. This successful validation suggests that the methods developed are capable of producingmore » significantly better generator simulation models than those now in use. A further advantage is that the method uses direct analysis of the generator design (without the need for empirical correction), allowing prediction of generator characteristics during the design process.« less
  • Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been investigating manufacturing processes for the uranium-10% molybdenum (U-10Mo) alloy plate-type fuel for the U.S. high-performance research reactors. This work supports the Convert Program of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative. This report documents modeling results of PNNL’s efforts to perform finite-element simulations to predict roll separating forces and rolling defects. Simulations were performed using a finite-element model developed using the commercial code LS-Dyna. Simulations of the hot rolling of U-10Mo coupons encapsulated in low-carbon steel have been conducted following two different schedules. Model predictions ofmore » the roll-separation force and roll-pack thicknesses at different stages of the rolling process were compared with experimental measurements. This report discusses various attributes of the rolled coupons revealed by the model (e.g., dog-boning and thickness non-uniformity).« less