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Title: Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

Abstract

In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
922292
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-06-11179
TRN: US200803%%417
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Marine Biotechnology
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ADHESION; ADHESIVES; AVAILABILITY; GENES; GLASS; MUSSELS; PLASTICS; PRODUCTION; PROTEINS; TEETH; WATER; WOOD; adhesion; biomimetics; marine mussel; Mytilus edulis; recombinant protein

Citation Formats

H. G. Silverman, and F. F. Roberto. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/s10126-007-9053-x.
H. G. Silverman, & F. F. Roberto. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion. United States. doi:10.1007/s10126-007-9053-x.
H. G. Silverman, and F. F. Roberto. Sat . "Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion". United States. doi:10.1007/s10126-007-9053-x.
@article{osti_922292,
title = {Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion},
author = {H. G. Silverman and F. F. Roberto},
abstractNote = {In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.},
doi = {10.1007/s10126-007-9053-x},
journal = {Marine Biotechnology},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Sat Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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