skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Precision volume measurement system.

Abstract

A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
921130
Report Number(s):
SAND2004-8105
TRN: US200803%%54
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; ACCURACY; VOLUME; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; DESIGN; HELIUM; KANSAS CITY PLANT; PRESSURE MEASUREMENT; PERFORMANCE; Measurement-Methodology.; Measuring instruments-Reliability.

Citation Formats

Fischer, Erin E., and Shugard, Andrew D. Precision volume measurement system.. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2172/921130.
Fischer, Erin E., & Shugard, Andrew D. Precision volume measurement system.. United States. doi:10.2172/921130.
Fischer, Erin E., and Shugard, Andrew D. 2004. "Precision volume measurement system.". United States. doi:10.2172/921130. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/921130.
@article{osti_921130,
title = {Precision volume measurement system.},
author = {Fischer, Erin E. and Shugard, Andrew D.},
abstractNote = {A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.},
doi = {10.2172/921130},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2004,
month =
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • A precision volume measurement system (PVMS) has been designed, built, and put into operation. The system is based on pressure-volume-temperature principles, uses helium as the source gas, and maintains temperature stability in a calorimeter bath. The accuracy/precision of the system varies with the size of the measured volume; however, typical readings for a 100-cm/sup 3/ volume show a precision of approximately 0.03% and an accuracy of approximately 0.05%.
  • This study began with a central question, ''What precision can be achieved with an electro-optic voltage sensor or a magneto-optic current sensor.'' The answer has been pursued in numerous ways - through an investigation of the basic properties of materials and components (both as reported in the literature and new data generated in our laboratory), through attempts to demonstrate the feasibility of overcoming certain limitations in the properties of components, through analysis of some fundamental limitations, through the proposal of new or refined designs, and through discussions with numerous other investigators. It was concluded that ease of obtaining high precisionmore » (in a power systems context) is not included among the advantages of using optical sensors for measurement of electromagnetic quantities. The principal difficulty was that sensors have to maintain their calibration over broad temperature ranges (at least 100/sup 0/C) without the possibility of temperature stabilization. Specifically, using relatively standard approaches and an appropriate definition of precision, a precision not better than about +-1% can be expected. Achieving this level of precision will require wise choices of materials, components, and design; numerous suggestions are offered.« less
  • An engineering study was undertaken to calibrate and certify a precision volume measurement system that uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) to ratio a known to an unknown volume. The constant-temperature, computer-controlled system was tested for thermodynamic instabilities, for precision (0.01%), and for bias (0.01%). Ratio scaling was used to optimize the quartz crystal pressure transducer calibration.
  • Vibration measurements were collected at the Precision Measurement Equipment Laboratory (PMEL) and Fire Station buildings during operations of the A/F32T-9 Large Turbo Fan Engine, Enclosed Noise Suppressor System (T-9 NSS) at McConnell AFB KS. The highest vibration levels were measured with an F101 engine operating at afterburner power in the T-9 NSS. The measured floor-vibration levels are well below both the limits recommended to prevent adverse health effects and those limits recommended to prevent decrease in proficiency at performing work tasks. The measured floor-vibration levels do not even exceed the threshold of perception of the most-sensitive individuals to whole-body vibration.more » Measurements did not rule out the possibility of exceeding recommended levels for interference with vibration sensitive calibrations at the PMEL buildings.« less