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Title: Blue sensors : technology and cooperative monitoring in UN peacekeeping.

Abstract

For over a half-century, the soldiers and civilians deployed to conflict areas in UN peacekeeping operations have monitored ceasefires and peace agreements of many types with varying degrees of effectiveness. Though there has been a significant evolution of peacekeeping, especially in the 1990s, with many new monitoring functions, the UN has yet to incorporate monitoring technologies into its operations in a systematic fashion. Rather, the level of technology depends largely on the contributing nations and the individual field commanders. In most missions, sensor technology has not been used at all. So the UN has not been able to fully benefit from the sensor technology revolution that has seen effectiveness greatly amplified and costs plummet. This paper argues that monitoring technologies need not replace the human factor, which is essential for confidence building in conflict areas, but they can make peacekeepers more effective, more knowledgeable and safer. Airborne, ground and underground sensors can allow peacekeepers to do better monitoring over larger areas, in rugged terrain, at night (when most infractions occur) and in adverse weather conditions. Technology also allows new ways to share gathered information with the parties to create confidence and, hence, better pre-conditions for peace. In the future sensorsmore » should become 'tools of the trade' to help the UN keep the peace in war-torn areas.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Canadian Forces College, Toronto, Ontario
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
918770
Report Number(s):
SAND2004-1380
TRN: US200825%%23
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; UNITED NATIONS; INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS; MONITORING; SENSORS; TECHNOLOGY UTILIZATION; REMOTE SENSING; Sensors.; Nuclear nonproliferation-Monitoring.; United Nations-Peacekeeping forces.

Citation Formats

Dorn, A Walter Dr. Blue sensors : technology and cooperative monitoring in UN peacekeeping.. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2172/918770.
Dorn, A Walter Dr. Blue sensors : technology and cooperative monitoring in UN peacekeeping.. United States. doi:10.2172/918770.
Dorn, A Walter Dr. Thu . "Blue sensors : technology and cooperative monitoring in UN peacekeeping.". United States. doi:10.2172/918770. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/918770.
@article{osti_918770,
title = {Blue sensors : technology and cooperative monitoring in UN peacekeeping.},
author = {Dorn, A Walter Dr.},
abstractNote = {For over a half-century, the soldiers and civilians deployed to conflict areas in UN peacekeeping operations have monitored ceasefires and peace agreements of many types with varying degrees of effectiveness. Though there has been a significant evolution of peacekeeping, especially in the 1990s, with many new monitoring functions, the UN has yet to incorporate monitoring technologies into its operations in a systematic fashion. Rather, the level of technology depends largely on the contributing nations and the individual field commanders. In most missions, sensor technology has not been used at all. So the UN has not been able to fully benefit from the sensor technology revolution that has seen effectiveness greatly amplified and costs plummet. This paper argues that monitoring technologies need not replace the human factor, which is essential for confidence building in conflict areas, but they can make peacekeepers more effective, more knowledgeable and safer. Airborne, ground and underground sensors can allow peacekeepers to do better monitoring over larger areas, in rugged terrain, at night (when most infractions occur) and in adverse weather conditions. Technology also allows new ways to share gathered information with the parties to create confidence and, hence, better pre-conditions for peace. In the future sensors should become 'tools of the trade' to help the UN keep the peace in war-torn areas.},
doi = {10.2172/918770},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2004},
month = {4}
}

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