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Title: Global Biofuel Use, 1850-2000.

Abstract

This paper presents annual, country-level estimates of biofuel use for the period 1850-2000. We estimate that global biofuel consumption rose from about 1000 Tg in 1850 to 2460 Tg in 2000, an increase of 140%. In the late 19th century, biofuel consumption in North America was very high, {approx}220-250 Tg/yr, because widespread land clearing supplied plentiful fuelwood. At that time biofuel use in Western Europe was lower, {approx}180-200 Tg/yr. As fossil fuels became available, biofuel use in the developed world fell. Compensating changes in other parts of the world, however, caused global consumption to remain remarkably stable between 1850 and 1950 at {approx}1200 {+-} 200 Tg/yr. It was only after World War II that biofuel use began to increase more rapidly in response to population growth in the developing world. Between 1950 and 2000, biofuel use in Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia grew by 170%, 160%, and 130%, respectively.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
FE; National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
914955
Report Number(s):
ANL/DIS/JA-58600
Journal ID: ISSN 0886-6236; GBCYEP; TRN: US200817%%177
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Global Biogeochem. Cycles J.; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 2 ; May 30, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; AFRICA; ASIA; BIOFUELS; FOSSIL FUELS; NORTH AMERICA; WESTERN EUROPE; WOOD FUELS

Citation Formats

Fernandes, S. D., Trautmann, N. M., Streets, D. G., Roden, C. A., Bond, T. C., Decision and Information Sciences, and Univ. of Illinois. Global Biofuel Use, 1850-2000.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1029/2006GB002836.
Fernandes, S. D., Trautmann, N. M., Streets, D. G., Roden, C. A., Bond, T. C., Decision and Information Sciences, & Univ. of Illinois. Global Biofuel Use, 1850-2000.. United States. doi:10.1029/2006GB002836.
Fernandes, S. D., Trautmann, N. M., Streets, D. G., Roden, C. A., Bond, T. C., Decision and Information Sciences, and Univ. of Illinois. Wed . "Global Biofuel Use, 1850-2000.". United States. doi:10.1029/2006GB002836.
@article{osti_914955,
title = {Global Biofuel Use, 1850-2000.},
author = {Fernandes, S. D. and Trautmann, N. M. and Streets, D. G. and Roden, C. A. and Bond, T. C. and Decision and Information Sciences and Univ. of Illinois},
abstractNote = {This paper presents annual, country-level estimates of biofuel use for the period 1850-2000. We estimate that global biofuel consumption rose from about 1000 Tg in 1850 to 2460 Tg in 2000, an increase of 140%. In the late 19th century, biofuel consumption in North America was very high, {approx}220-250 Tg/yr, because widespread land clearing supplied plentiful fuelwood. At that time biofuel use in Western Europe was lower, {approx}180-200 Tg/yr. As fossil fuels became available, biofuel use in the developed world fell. Compensating changes in other parts of the world, however, caused global consumption to remain remarkably stable between 1850 and 1950 at {approx}1200 {+-} 200 Tg/yr. It was only after World War II that biofuel use began to increase more rapidly in response to population growth in the developing world. Between 1950 and 2000, biofuel use in Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia grew by 170%, 160%, and 130%, respectively.},
doi = {10.1029/2006GB002836},
journal = {Global Biogeochem. Cycles J.},
number = 2 ; May 30, 2007,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed May 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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