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Title: Evaluation of the wear properties of high interstitial stainless steels

Abstract

Adding carbon to high nitrogen steels increases interstitial concentrations over what can be obtained with nitrogen addition alone. This can results in an increase in hardness, strength, and wear resistance. The alloys produced for this study were all based on commercially available high-nitrogen Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steel. This study is the first significant wear study of these new high interstitial nitrogen-carbon stainless steel alloys. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk abrasion, dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion, impeller impact, and jet erosion. Increasing interstitial concentration increased strength and hardness and improved wear resistance under all test conditions. The results are discussed in terms of overall interstitial alloy concentration.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
913366
Report Number(s):
DOE/NETL-IR-2007-121
TRN: US200802%%792
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 16th International Conference on Wear of Materials, Montreal, Canada, April 15-19, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ABRASION; ALLOYS; CARBON; EVALUATION; HARDNESS; INTERSTITIALS; NITROGEN; NITROGEN ADDITIONS; STAINLESS STEELS; STEELS; WEAR RESISTANCE; WHEELS; wear properties; interstitial stainless steels

Citation Formats

Tylczak, J.H., Rawers, J.C., and Alman, D.E. Evaluation of the wear properties of high interstitial stainless steels. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Tylczak, J.H., Rawers, J.C., & Alman, D.E. Evaluation of the wear properties of high interstitial stainless steels. United States.
Tylczak, J.H., Rawers, J.C., and Alman, D.E. Sun . "Evaluation of the wear properties of high interstitial stainless steels". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_913366,
title = {Evaluation of the wear properties of high interstitial stainless steels},
author = {Tylczak, J.H. and Rawers, J.C. and Alman, D.E.},
abstractNote = {Adding carbon to high nitrogen steels increases interstitial concentrations over what can be obtained with nitrogen addition alone. This can results in an increase in hardness, strength, and wear resistance. The alloys produced for this study were all based on commercially available high-nitrogen Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steel. This study is the first significant wear study of these new high interstitial nitrogen-carbon stainless steel alloys. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk abrasion, dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion, impeller impact, and jet erosion. Increasing interstitial concentration increased strength and hardness and improved wear resistance under all test conditions. The results are discussed in terms of overall interstitial alloy concentration.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Friction and corrosive wear experiments were performed in a geothermal-geopressured brine and in a 3% NaCl solution in a friction and wear electrolytic cell. The formation of a passive film on 304 stainless steel has a beneficial effect on the magnitude of the coefficient of friction. When pits are electrochemically introduced in the passive film, the friction coefficient becomes even lower than the passive coefficient of friction in the 3% NaCl, but does not significantly change for the brine. The effect of corrosive wear on the surface film is more difficult to assess. Auger spectroscopy was performed on wear surfacesmore » (subjected to both electrochemical and mechanical action) and non-wear surfaces (subjected only to electrochemical action). The surface films formed in 3% NaCl in the non-wear and wear areas including pits consisted of Cr, Fe and Ni in ratios consistent to the bulk material plus 0. In brine the surface film consists of the same elements as above; however, the surface film associated with the non-wear area and the wear area pit show a Cr depletion. Yet, the wear area film is consistent with bulk as in the case of the 3% NaCl.« less
  • A new series of high nitrogen-carbon manganese stainless steel alloys are studied for their wear resistance. High nitrogen and carbon concentrations were obtained by melting elemental iron-chromium-manganese (several with minor alloy additions of nickel, silicon, and molybdenum) in a nitrogen atmosphere and adding elemental graphite. The improvement in material properties (hardness and strength) with increasing nitrogen and carbon interstitial concentration was consistent with previously reported improvements in similar material properties alloyed with nitrogen only. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk, sand-rubber-wheel, impeller, and jet erosion. Additions of interstitial nitrogen and carbon as well as interstitial nitrogen and carbide precipitates were foundmore » to greatly improve material properties. In general, with increasing nitrogen and carbon concentrations, strength, hardness, and wear resistance increased.« less
  • For successful application of high-alloyed stainless steels for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) plants, pitting corrosion resistance of arc welds of N-added 6%Mo austenitic stainless steels (UNS N 08367) and super duplex stainless steels (UNS S 32550) made with various filler metals were evaluated using the Green Death solution. For Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) and Gas Metal Arc (GMA) welds of N 08367, Critical Pitting Temperature (CPT) of base metal was 65--70 C, whereas weld made by ERNiCrMo-3 filler metal yielded CPT of 50 C. Welds made by ERNiCrMo-10 or ERNiCrMo-4 filler metals showed CPT of 60--65 C and 65--70C, respectively.more » For GTA and GMA welds of S 32550, CPT of welds made by ERNiCrMo-3 was 45--50 C, indicating that the filler metal can provide pitting corrosion resistance matching the S 32550 alloy. Thus, a proper pitting corrosion resistance of weldments of high-alloy stainless steels can be achieved by selecting filler metals having at least +10 higher Pitting Resistance Equivalent Number (PRE{sub N}) value than the base metal regardless of the type of arc welding process. The over-alloyed filler metals would compensate preferential segregation of Cr, MO along the dendrite boundary, which made the dendrite core more susceptible to pitting. Nitrogen addition to the GTA welds of N 08367 made with ERNiCrMo-3 failed to improve pitting corrosion resistance, which was attributed to the precipitation of nitrogen in the weld metal in the form of Nb-nitride.« less
  • Stainless steels can be considered as good candidates for use in H{sub 2}S-CO{sub 2} containing gas fields provided that their limits of use are accurately known. As the main problem for these materials is the resistance to stress corrosion cracking, laboratory tests were conducted on various stainless steels either austenitics or duplexes in NACE TM 01-77 solution as well as in simulating field environments. The combination of Constant Load and Slow Strain Rate tests results permitted stating conservative limiting environmental conditions for SCC expressed as P{sub H{sub 2}S} and temperature values. Moreover, the resistance of the steels appeared to bemore » mainly dependent on their chemical composition by considering chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen additions (PREN).« less